Cymraeg (Welsh): un ar bymtheg

Pearl

Senior Member
Spain - Catalan, Spanish, English, Icelandic
Could anyone show me light for that sentence? "un ar bymtheg"

How is number 17 spelled in gaelic?

I know this goes further the language used in this forum but I don't know where to search.

:eek:
 
  • L'irlandais

    Senior Member
    Ireland: English-speaking ♂
    Hello Pearl,
    Long time without an answer. It's Welsh for the number 16 : un ar bymtheg - literally one on five-ten
    17 would be something like dwy ar bymtheg , though perhaps a native speaker might confirm that.
     

    Gerontius

    New Member
    English - Britain
    17 in Welsh is dau/dwy ar bymtheg in the traditional form, but in modern teaching a decimal system is usually used, and in this 17 is un deg saith.

    I cannot help you with Gaelic.
     

    L'irlandais

    Senior Member
    Ireland: English-speaking ♂
    Hello Gerontius,
    Welcome to the forums.
    As Chaucer already pointed out, there are " many Gaelics". I suspect that Pearl has mixed up the two branches of the "Insular Celtic" language family.
    The original question was about the Welsh dwy ar bymtheg (17).
    In Irish ithe number would be seacht déag, however I don't believe it's what Pearl was looking for.
     

    franc 91

    Senior Member
    English - GB
    I remember explaining this way of counting in Welsh - (I realise it has been simplified since) - to some French people, only to be told quite emphatically that I was counting according to Roman numerals ie II + XV. (In Breton they still have two-twenty, three-twenty and quatre-vingts).
     

    Gerontius

    New Member
    English - Britain
    Likewise in the traditional Welsh system, 20 is ugain, 40 is deugain (= dau ugain, two twenties) 60 is trigain (tri ugain) and 80 is pedwar ugain. So 30 is deg ar hugain, (ten on twenty) 50 is deg a deugain, 70 is deg a thrigain (some tricky mutations there!)

    The modern trend is to use the decimal forms dau ddeg, tri deg, pedwar deg, pum deg, chwe deg, etc.

    I don't know about the Roman idea though. I can see that XVII is two on fifteen / dau (dwy) ar bymtheg, but the Romans counted in tens, not twenties. Latin viginti (20) and Welsh ugain are probably related, but triginta is 30, not trigain, 60.
     
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