Czech (Republic?)

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1516

Member
русский
Can you say/write Czech instead of Czech Republic (meaning the country) or are there no ways to shorten the name?
 
  • perpend

    Banned
    American English
    1516, Are you referring to the one part of former Czechoslovakia, or to one of the former Soviet Republics?
     

    morior_invictus

    Senior Member
    Slovak
    Can you say/write Czech instead of Czech Republic (meaning the country) or are there no ways to shorten the name?
    I`m sorry, 1516, but there is no shorter name for the Czech Republic.
    1516, Are you referring to the one part of former Czechoslovakia, or to one of the former Soviet Republics?
    First I wanted to send you flowers for that right note that Czechoslovakia no longer exists, but then I saw that thing with Soviet Republics and I changed my mind. :D
     
    Last edited:

    Enquiring Mind

    Senior Member
    English - the Queen's
    ... are there no ways to shorten the name?
    Hi 1516, as the other posters have said, "the Czech Republic" is the only good English way to say it. After the two countries split, there was a move in the Czech Republic to have the name "Czechia" adopted, but it never caught on. It just doesn't sound English.

    However there are other ways you can refer to it in context - but only informally or colloquially. You can say (colloquially) "I'm off to Czecho next week" - that's the equivalent of the colloquial word Czechs themselves use.

    In colloquial written English in a context that is clear - for example in e-mails to friends, I often just use "Cz", as in "I just got back from Cz last week". There's no other word in English that begins with Cz, so there's no risk of misunderstanding.
     

    vianie

    Senior Member
    Slovak
    There have been several suggestions to establish the form Czechlands. I see this as the best sensemaking solution in English.
     

    srk

    Senior Member
    English - US
    Enquiring Mind said:
    You can say (colloquially) "I'm off to Czecho next week"
    "Czecho" is used in Tinker, Tailor, Soldier, Spy to refer to Czechoslovakia. The action was around Brno. Was "Czecho", in the day that the story is set, used to refer to just the Czech-speaking part?
     

    Enquiring Mind

    Senior Member
    English - the Queen's
    Either they would have been referring to only the Czech-speaking part of Czechoslovakia (as it was then), or just using "Czecho" as a short form of "Czechoslovakia". TTSS , written by John Le Carré, was a distinctly British context, and according to the relevant Wiki page here, it used a number of Britishisms.
     

    PaulQ

    Senior Member
    UK
    English - England
    It is more likely that Czecho was specific Intelligence Service jargon rather than a general Britishism. :cool:
     
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