Dae-dal

Discussion in 'English Only' started by Packard, Dec 17, 2009.

  1. Packard

    Packard Senior Member

    USA, English
    Context:

    I came across the word "daedal" in an article describing the Jules Verne character Phileas Fogg (from Around the World in 80 Days). I was not familiar with the word and I looked it up in Farlex on-line dictionary:


    dae·dal
    adj. 1. Ingenious and complex in design or function; intricate.
    2. Finely or skillfully made or employed; artistic.



    Question:

    Is this word in current usage? Obsolete? Archaic?

    I am tempted to use the word but I would not want to if it is archaic or obsolete.

    Farlex makes it seem current, but I've never heard or seen the word in the past.
     
    Last edited: Dec 17, 2009
  2. ewie

    ewie Senior Member

    Another Country
    English English (they named it twice)
    Never ever heard of it, Mr.P.
     
  3. panjandrum

    panjandrum Quondam Moderator

    Belfast, Ireland
    English-Ireland (top end)
    I haven't seen this before.
    BNC and COCA have no examples other than two COCA references to Daedal as a company name.

    The OED notes "poetical".

    BNC - British National Corpus
    COCA - Corpus of Contemporary American English
     
  4. ewie

    ewie Senior Member

    Another Country
    English English (they named it twice)
    Oh! I've just got it: Daedalus was the chap who built the minotaur's maze (amongst other things).
     
  5. Packard

    Packard Senior Member

    USA, English
    The three of us have not seen this word used before. From that I can either conclude that it is obsolete, or the three of us are under-educated. I'm going with obsolete at this time and I think I will not use the word in speech.

    Thanks,


    Packard

    (I'm still interested in other comments).
     
  6. Aaar

    Aaar Senior Member

    New Jersey
    English -USA
    In speech!? I hope not. It would be pronounced "diddle", yes?

    I doubt it's obsolete; that would imply it was in use at some time.
     
  7. Packard

    Packard Senior Member

    USA, English
    If it were from the Latin I would say it was pronounced "die-dil"; but since it is from the Greek I would guess it would be pronounced "deed-dil".

    According to "Your Dictionary" on-line it is indeed "deed-dil".

    See: http://www.yourdictionary.com/daedal
     
    Last edited: Dec 17, 2009
  8. ewie

    ewie Senior Member

    Another Country
    English English (they named it twice)
    Yes, deedle is how I'd say it. (I'm sure there's a pun somewhere involving doodle but I'm too tired to look for it.)
     
  9. Aaar

    Aaar Senior Member

    New Jersey
    English -USA
    Yet daedalus is pronounced ded′'l əs. Strange.

    Indeed, this quote shows up online in several places (wikipedia, for one):

    "Phileas Fogg can be described as being an arcane, stolid, reserved, wanderlustuous, expeditious, untoady, indomitable, burnished, hyperopic, magnanimous, well-mannered, benignant, abstinent, daedal gentleman."

    I'm wondering if the person who wrote this description didn't invent daedal, being too lazy to write daedalian or daedalic. Hyperopic looks suspicious here, too.

    I like untoady, though. :)
     
  10. ewie

    ewie Senior Member

    Another Country
    English English (they named it twice)
    To say nothing of wanderlustuous. (Wanderlustful shurely?)
    The one time I said the word Daedalus out loud, I pronounced it deedle us.
     
  11. panjandrum

    panjandrum Quondam Moderator

    Belfast, Ireland
    English-Ireland (top end)
    It's unlikely, unless he hadn't heard of it before and re-invented it.
    The OED lists examples of daedal from the sixteenth century.
     

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