Damned if...

Emiliana de Lunares

Senior Member
English-American
Hello, forum friends!

I was wondering if the following sentence is grammatically correct/makes sense in general.

Original sentence: Damned if he didn't go to every single place that every one of our workers lived.

My attempt: Me sorprendería si él no fue a cada maldito lugar donde vive cada uno de nuestros trabajadores.

Sound weird?
Thank you in advance for your time and assistance.
I hope to hear from someone soon :)
 
  • gengo

    Senior Member
    American English
    I'm not a native, but it sounds weird to me.

    Just to help the natives, I'll add that the full phrase is "I'll be damned if he..." This is a set construction, and means that the speaker is positively certain about what he is saying. Literally, the speaker is willing to be damned (go to Hell) if what he says is not the truth. We use this phrase when stating something that may be hard to believe.
     

    Agró

    Senior Member
    Spanish-Navarre
    Hubo un tiempo en que se traducía "Que me aspen si (no)..." en películas y series.
    A mí, actualmente, me suena ridículo.

    Desde luego que fue...
    Vaya que sí fue...
     

    gengo

    Senior Member
    American English
    Desde luego que fue...
    Vaya que sí fue...
    Those sound good to me. I'm surprised that Spanish doesn't have an equivalent construction, given the religious history of Spain. Maybe it was just those Britons who liked to talk about being damned or blinded (blimey = blind me). :)
     

    Santander96

    Senior Member
    English, Spanish - USA
    A colloquial equivalente you could use:
    Me quito el nombre si él no fue a cada maldito lugar donde vive cada uno de nuestros trabajadores.
     

    heybach

    Member
    Spanish
    Yo, tras investigar largo y tendido para entender el significado de la expresión, opino que:

    I'll be damned if + negativo = "me juego el cuello a que.." + afirmativo
     

    heybach

    Member
    Spanish
    But now I wonder, is the original sentence talking about past or future? Has the action been carried out (to visit the places)?
    He could have already visitied the places and you don't know (yet) or he could visit them in the future and that's your bet, which you might find out soon.

    Have I been clear enough?

    Thanks!
     

    KawwaK

    Member
    Spanish
    And keep in mind that: "...every one of our workers lived (past)." = "donde vivió (o vivía) cada uno de nuestros trabajadores"
     

    heybach

    Member
    Spanish
    Thanks, but that's not the part I'm referring to. It doesn't matter if they lived or still live there.

    The question is about the "if they didn't go". I know this is the past tense.

    Is it just the tense used with "I'll be damned if" or you could also say "I'll be damned if they don't go..."?
     

    sound shift

    Senior Member
    English - England
    But now I wonder, is the original sentence talking about past or future? Has the action been carried out (to visit the places)?
    It's talking about the past. The speaker is saying that the person referred to as "he" went to every single place ...", and the "damned" tells us that the speaker is annoyed about this.
     

    heybach

    Member
    Spanish
    Yes. This is talking about the future, of course. It doesn't indicate annoyance. It means that the speaker is very sure that he will go.
    Thanks once again. Here I come with another example:

    "I told them it would be boring but I'll be damned if they didn't come anyway.".

    Is the speaker referring to future or past? Did they come (past) or will they surely come (future)? Is the speaker showing annoyance or certainty?
     

    gato radioso

    Senior Member
    spanish-spain
    Que me zurzan...
    Que me yo muera ahora mismo...
    Que me den morcilla....
    Maldita sea mi estampa....

    ….si él no fue al (puto) lugar donde vive cada uno de nuestros trabajadores
     

    sound shift

    Senior Member
    English - England
    "I told them it would be boring but I'll be damned if they didn't come anyway.".

    Is the speaker referring to future or past? Did they come (past) or will they surely come (future)? Is the speaker showing annoyance or certainty?
    To the past. They came. The speaker is showing annoyance or surprise; the context will indicate which.
     
    < Previous | Next >
    Top