dance concert

muppyclaire

Senior Member
Italy, italian
Hi everybody!
I'd like to understand the reason why in english we say "dance concert". I think this expression means "dance show" (maybe with intrumentalists on stage, or in the "orchestra")... But does it refers to "classical ballet" ... or to "dance" in general terms - for example "contemporary dance", "salsa", "tango"?
Moreover, is it more used in AE than in EE?
Thanks,
Muppy
 
  • I am not a native, so I might be missing something here, but the expression dance concert doesn't strike me as particularly standard or colloquial, at least in BE (I don't know what EE is).

    Dance show or dance performance would seem more natural to me, when referring to anything that's NOT ballet. Classical ballet would be called ballet.
     

    GreenWhiteBlue

    Senior Member
    USA - English
    If it were students who were dancing, I would call it a dance recital. If I were going to watch professionals, I would say I was going to a dance performance. Dance concert, on the other hand, strikes my ears (which are accustomed to AE) as being very odd.
     

    ewie

    Senior Member
    English English
    Agree, Dimcl. I'm not at all sure what a dance concert would be. Maybe a standard music concert but with people dancing somewhere in order to keep the audience awake ... ?
     

    muppyclaire

    Senior Member
    Italy, italian
    The author is talking about a single experience... not no much contextualized, as an exemple of how special interest affect the perception of a fact. The complete sentence is:
    "Once I went to a dance concert with a dancer, and while I was enjoying the general performance, the dancer I was with was constantly looking at how the person's toe was pointed" (that's why I believed he was talking about ballet...)
    Even though I'm not a native, the expression "dance concert" seems to me very obsolete, old-fashioned... Am I right?
    Thanks, Muppy
     

    ewie

    Senior Member
    English English
    Maybe not so much 'obsolete' or 'old-fashioned', Muppy, as not terribly common ... or clear. A concert is music; a dance recital (as GWB says) is dancing. I just find it difficult to imagine a dance (performance) without music.
     

    Loob

    Senior Member
    English UK
    Muppy, you might want to try googling on "dance concert" to get a flavour of what it covers. It gets quite a few hits:)
     

    Matching Mole

    Senior Member
    England, English
    Although I share the unfamiliarity with this term that many posters have expressed, I see that the OED has this sub-definition for "concert":
    A dancing performance consisting of single items, folk-dances, etc. (in contrast to a full-scale ballet).

    It seems to have first appeared in the early 20th c. It's presumably a borrowing from the word's usage in a musical context, meaning the equivalent in structure, content and purpose, but with choreographic pieces as the focus, rather than musical compositions. I don't see why not: the word "concert" is strongly associated with music, but at root, is not constrained to it.
     

    muppyclaire

    Senior Member
    Italy, italian
    Illuminating, dear friends! And you, Matching Mole, with your defintion from the OED... Now it's more clear to me! :)

    I hope it was interesting and challenging for you too!

    I don't know if I can express my opinion (or my feeling) here, or if it's contrary to the rules, but I find this "Only English" the most friendly forum - even with not native persons. Thank you
     
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