Danish: Hvad hedder du?

  • AlOlaf

    Member
    English - USA
    But "hedde" is the infinitive and "hedder" is the present. I thought it might be similar to "læse" and "læser", infinitive and present, respectively, where the former has no stød, but the latter does.
     

    jette(DK)

    Senior Member
    Danish
    the infinitiv (hedde) is without 'stød'.

    But the present tense ('hedder) and the past tense ('hed) both have 'stød'.

    This is something I can hear as a native speaker. I'm not familiar with the rules, I'm afraid.
     

    Sepia

    Senior Member
    High German/Danish
    But "hedde" is the infinitive and "hedder" is the present. I thought it might be similar to "læse" and "læser", infinitive and present, respectively, where the former has no stød, but the latter does.
    OK, but here

    læsse, læsser

    you are in the same situation as with "hedde". You see the difference? It is the syllables.
     

    bicontinental

    Senior Member
    English (US), Danish, bilingual
    But "hedde" is the infinitive and "hedder" is the present. I thought it might be similar to "læse" and "læser", infinitive and present, respectively, where the former has no stød, but the latter does.
    That’s exactly right.

    As you know, Danish grammar is characterized by many exceptions to a limited number of rules and that goes for those pertaining to the glottal stop (stød) in verbal forms as well. There´s a summary in this Wikipedia note (in Danish) that you may find useful. http://da.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stød_(sproglyd)

    Generally the stød occurs in verbal forms with one syllable, which of course includes the imperative form of many verbs ( ´løb, ´gø, ´gå, ´spis, ´hent etc.) and in verbs with the prefix be-, er-, for- (be´tale, er´fare, for´klare).
    The present tense of irregular verbs: ´hedder (hed), ´flyver (fløj), ´lyver (løj), ´finder (fandt) etc.

    Bic.
     

    AlOlaf

    Member
    English - USA
    Thanks very much for the confirmation. I have an Assimil textbook that uses a phonetic script to approximate the pronunciation of the Danish dialogues and to show where stød occurs. This script doesn't show stød to occur in "hedder", but I thought I could hear it. I want to get it right, so thanks again for the imformative clarification.
     

    Sepia

    Senior Member
    High German/Danish
    It seems to me that you all don't have the same concept of what "stød" means ... to add more meaning to this thread it would probably be useful if you defined what you mean, each one of you.


    Furthermore, there are also regional differences, all leading to the point where the following joke makes perfekt sense in Copenhagen but does not really work in Jutland:

    - Hvorfor hedder denne bydel "Hedehusene".
    - Jah, de huse skulle vel hedde et eller andet.
     

    MindBoggle

    Senior Member
    Danish. English from childhood
    Stød is glottal stop. English speakers know it already - it occurs in dialects like cockney in words like better (be'er).

    In Danish, glottal stop occurs in the national standard (rigsdansk), and in northern dialects, but not in southern.
     

    Sepia

    Senior Member
    High German/Danish
    ... and not very distinct the way people speak around Copenhagen, even though theoretically there. And that is the "Standard Danish" spoken by about 1/4 of the population.
     

    Rubjerg

    New Member
    Danish
    The Danish "stød", I read some time ago in Wikipedia, is usually not realized as a full glottal stop (the way it's found in Cockney, Hawaiian and others), but typically with a 'creaky voice'. I've been trying to observe this, both with myself and others, and tend to agree.

    That's speaking for the standard, though. Some dialects on rural Zealand make VERY pronounced glottal stops for støds.
     
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