Danish pastry - and Rosinenschnecke

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Schmizzkazz

Senior Member
German
Danish pastry - and Rosinenschnecke

Danish pastry

Danish pastry with apricots and cinnamon
Presuming that it is like a Rosinenschnecke.
Most of these Teilchen are called "Danish" or "Danish pastry" in GB. Why Danish I have no idea, but that's what my parents always order when we're in a German café
Schnecke im Zusammenhang mit Backwaren - Englisch gesucht: Englisch ⇔ Deutsch Forum - leo.org

Rosinenschnecke translates literally as "raisin snail".

I wonder whether those "snails" exist in the English speaking world.

And if so, what is their name?
 
  • lingobingo

    Senior Member
    English - England
    In the UK they’re simply thought of as one type of Danish pastry, as your extract suggests. If asked to name that type, I’d probably call it a “raisin whirl”, but I see that Waitrose uses the term “raison swirl”.
     

    Uncle Jack

    Senior Member
    British English
    [....] for me "Danish pastry" is a catch-all term for all sorts of sweet pastries, and for this particular example I use the French term, pain aux raisins:
    1582289088824.png


    There is also a cinnamon whirl, but this does not usually include raisins.
     
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    Roxxxannne

    Senior Member
    English (northeastern US)
    There is such a thing in American English as a pastry called a 'snail': Google "snail pastry" and you will see many examples, including recipes.
     

    Schmizzkazz

    Senior Member
    German
    In the UK they’re simply thought of as one type of Danish pastry, as your extract suggests. If asked to name that type, I’d probably call it a “raisin whirl”, but I see that Waitrose uses the term “raison swirl”.
    whirl or swirl?

    We 'll have to find out!
     

    JulianStuart

    Senior Member
    English (UK then US)
    That begs raises the question of when a "foreign" word becomes an "English" word. It seems that the bigger the dictionary, the more likely one is to find a word that is common in another language and only occasionally is used by Engish speakers. Quite a few words in the National Spelling Bee fall into this category :)
     

    Uncle Jack

    Senior Member
    British English
    I cannot think that any English speaker who uses "pain aux raisins" thinks that it is an English term. However, since there isn't an obvious English term to use (not in BrE, at any rate), the French term is commonly used instead. It really is French, not a loan word such as cafe or kindergarten which might now be called English, and I am not sure that I would expect to find it in an English dictionary. It is not in OED.

    Schnecke is in OED, although it is listed as "chiefly U.S.", and all four of the quoted uses are from American sources, which might well be why I have never heard of it.
     
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    Ponyprof

    Senior Member
    Canadian English
    In North America a "Danish pastry" can refer to a wide range of things that usually include one or more of flaky pastry, custard, or fruit filling and tend to be flattish in profile.. They are typically a snack or coffee break food, not a desert. They can run a gamut of quality from light and delicious in a good bakery to flat damp heavy sticky in a school cafeteria.

    I have also seen the term "snail" applied to a pastry in a coil form, cinnamon or raisin or other.

    I expect that many iterations would be disappointing to someone freshly arrived from Europe!

    Our North American baking traditions are based on British models but with waves of immigrants over centuries there can be regional specialties that retain original names and forms. Especially Italian, German, and European Jewish (the latter especially in NYC with Yiddish or German names). So it is perfectly possible that there is a Midwestern American city that had a huge German population 100 years ago and still calls some pastries by German words unknown elsewhere in the country!
     
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    The Newt

    Senior Member
    English - US
    I have no idea how this fits in the English Only forum where we are not allowed to discuss other languages, but for me "Danish pastry" is a catch-all term for all sorts of sweet pastries, and for this particular example I use the French term, pain aux raisins:
    View attachment 38423

    There is also a cinnamon whirl, but this does not usually include raisins.
    In the US we'd probably call the item in your picture a cinnamon raisin bun, but there are several similar names in use as well.
     

    Schmizzkazz

    Senior Member
    German
    I can translate Rosinen-Schnecke as "raisin snail" - but I do not think that people in the UK or USA really say so.
    That's way I have come here to ask.

    In the US we'd probably call the item in your picture a cinnamon raisin bun, but there are several similar names in use as well.
    That's what I am interested in.
    What are other names that could be used?
     
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    JulianStuart

    Senior Member
    English (UK then US)
    I can translate Rosinen-Schnecke as "raisin snail" - but I do not think that people in the UK or USA really say so.
    That's way I have come here to ask.
    But they do. See post #12. If it has its own entry in the WRF dictionary, it must be used by quite a lot of people (in the US - the entry is from a US dictionary). I used to eat these popular brand "Raisin snails" but dropped them a while ago. Wikimedia commons gives Raisin snail as one of the English translations.
     

    Myridon

    Senior Member
    English - US
    As with many food-related items, there is variation by region. I can find them in pretty much every (super)market in California - you just need to know where to look :D
    Are you saying that they have pastries labelled "raisin snails" or they have some pastry that looks like that with a different name?
     

    Myridon

    Senior Member
    English - US
    As noted in post #12 and #24 :) I suppose you need to see a picture to believe the posts:) ?
    This thread is a little scattered. It's hard to follow who's talking about Danish, schnecken, snails, cinnamon rolls, ... So, yes, pictures do help as does using the word you mean instead of "them". :)
     

    Edinburgher

    Senior Member
    German/English bilingual
    If it has its own entry in the WRF dictionary, it must be used by quite a lot of people
    It turns out that "schnecke" doesn't actually have an entry in WRF as such, even though what I said in #14 can be taken to imply it.

    You can put any old bunch of letters in the search box, and it will just generate a page for you, will tell you what it knows about the term (namely nothing in this case -- there are no contributions for "schnecke" from Random House or Collins), and will auto-generate corresponding links to M-W and dictionary.com. It was just by luck that those two happened to have entries for it.
     

    Schmizzkazz

    Senior Member
    German
    You can put any old bunch of letters in the search box, and it will just generate a page for you, will tell you what it knows about the term (namely nothing in this case -- there are no contributions for "schnecke" from Random House or Collins)
    So it is!
    So it is exactly!
     

    JulianStuart

    Senior Member
    English (UK then US)
    This thread is a little scattered. It's hard to follow who's talking about Danish, schnecken, snails, cinnamon rolls, ... So, yes, pictures do help as does using the word you mean instead of "them". :)
    When the words "Raisin snails " are made into links,
    But they do. See post #12. If it has its own entry in the WRF dictionary, it must be used by quite a lot of people (in the US - the entry is from a US dictionary). I used to eat these popular brand "Raisin snails" but dropped them a while ago. Wikimedia commons gives Raisin snail as one of the English translations.
    I thought many people would click on them to see which "them" was being referred to :D

    I was, however, confused by why people were discussing schnecke in English given the clarity of the OP.
    Rosinenschnecke translates literally as "raisin snail".
    I wonder whether those "snails" exist in the English speaking world.
    And if so, what is their name?
    However, it seems we have sorted it (out) - they are called raisin snails in some parts of the US, but clearly not all.
     

    Roxxxannne

    Senior Member
    English (northeastern US)
    It surprises me, too. Just because you can Google something doesn't mean it's well known in the entire country.
    True. Nationally-known 'baking entities' (King Arthur Flour and Martha Stewart) use the term online, but we need to know what home bakers have written for the names of similar recipes on their butter-stained 3 x 5 cards stored in little metal boxes on kitchen shelves.

    PS
    And now, in reference to comment #30, we can hand this matter off to some enterprising Ph.D. student searching for a dissertation topic. :)
     
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