darci dentro

leecuritch

New Member
Romanian
Hi, WR!
While reading a book translated from english to italian i ran across an expression i simply cannot find the meaning of: ci da' dentro. The context is: "Cazzarola, ho pensato che avessero un megafono. Non solo ci da' dentro, ma e' anche rumoroso". The paragraph reffers to a guy with a very active, noisy sexual life. Well...
I'm pretty sure it's some sort of slang, yet, could someone please explain to me what this expression means and implicitly, what this guy is doing exactly?
Thank you.
 
  • Odysseus54

    Mod huc mod illuc
    Italian - Marche
    It is from 'darci dentro', but it does not only, or exactly, mean 'to get going'.

    ' Abbiamo solo due ore prima del tramonto - diamoci dentro ' = ' let's get going ' (if you are starting then ) or ' let's work hard(er) at it ' ( if we are say harvesting ) , 'let's drive faster' ( if we are talking about getting somewhere ) etc etc.

    Literally, it means something like 'to hit it hard'.

    Es. : 'Guarda quella ragazza con quel piatto di tagliatelle - ci sta proprio dando dentro'.
     

    xmas50

    Senior Member
    USA
    Italian - Italy
    Well..., according to the context (and I think this is the case in leecuritch's example) it could also mean "to have an active sexual life" in veeeeeery colloquial/slang Italian.
    A couple of examples really said by some male friends of mine:

    Gino e` uno che ci da` dentro = He doesn't waste any occasion (if you know what I mean :))
    Nonostante l'eta`, ci do ancora dentro

    Did I confuse you enough?
    Ciao
     

    Odysseus54

    Mod huc mod illuc
    Italian - Marche
    Yes - in the original example , depending on the context, it could also mean " He copulates a lot, very often " as well as " he copulates very vigorously and with much enthusiasm ".

    But, if the subject is , even vaguely, eating or drinking, it would mean " He eats ( or drinks ) a lot " etc.
     

    leecuritch

    New Member
    Romanian
    Xmas50, as i mentioned it previously, something very colloquial is what i had in mind too. In this context something like "not only he pushes it hard, but..." may underline the colloquialism and some hint to sex. Since i'm far from a pro in speaking or understanding italian, just wanted to make sure. Thank you oh so much.
    Anyway, what's great is that when you ask something on WR you're not just being answered to and that's that, there's always a broader horizon and things keep adding up for a better comprehension. Therefore, thank you Odysseus54.
     

    thehaggis555

    Member
    English
    Hi there,

    Could this be translated as 'You have to give your all'? Or is that completely wrong?

    Context: Se vuoi continuare a fare ciò che ti piace devi darci dentro!

    Thanks!
     

    Curandera

    Senior Member
    Italian
    I believe you could say that.

    A couple of alternatives:

    Se vuoi continuare a fare ciò che ti piace devi dare tutto te stesso/devi dare il massimo (di te stesso).
     

    Spleenloene

    Member
    Chinese
    Ciao a tutti!

    Sto leggendo un libro, e non capisco questa frase:

    (un ragazzo correva con i suoi compagni di squadra) All'inizio ci davo dentro. Ero nuovo in squadra e volevo dimostrare quanto volevo.

    Che significa "ci davo dentro"? "I ran fast"? "I ran faster than others"? Come la tradurreste?

    Grazie mille~
     

    Alessandrino

    Senior Member
    Italiano
    Non si riferisce specificamente alla corsa, anche se nel contesto potrebbe anche andare. Darci dentro significa impegnarsi in maniera particolare nel fare qualcosa. In inglese, potresti tradurlo con to buckle down to something.
     

    Spleenloene

    Member
    Chinese
    Non si riferisce specificamente alla corsa, anche se nel contesto potrebbe anche andare. Darci dentro significa impegnarsi in maniera particolare nel fare qualcosa. In inglese, potresti tradurlo con to buckle down to something.
    wow I think you are right! in this way the sentences makes sense...thank you!
     

    __Tony__

    New Member
    English - American
    I'm trying to understand "Diamoci dentro!" and after reading the posts here I conclude it's similar to "Come on, let's get into it!". For English speakers this use of "dare" is very hard to understand in terms of how we use "give". Similarly, the common italian use of "Dai!" to express exasperation is hard for English speakers to understand. Again, it seems similar to an expression involving "come": "Come on!!". As I tried to think of corresponding English expressions using give, I came up with "What gives?!" for "Dai!" -- which sounds natural, but for "Diamoci dentro" the closest I can think of is "Let's give ourselves to it!" which doesn't really sound natural. But I think the meaning is close in each case. Am I right?
     

    rrose17

    Senior Member
    Canada, English
    I'd say for idiomatic expressions don't try and translate them literally, there's not much point. Just as C'mon! in English sounds silly if translated directly into Italian, something like "dai!" should just be learned how and when/where to use it and not to worry too much that it doesn't make much sense in another language. My 2 cents.
     

    theartichoke

    Senior Member
    English - Canada
    Based on the early examples about noisy sex and plates of tagliatelle (not together :D), it sounds like a case for going at it:

    Damn, I thought they had a megaphone! He's not just going at it, he's being loud!
    Look at that girl with the plate of tagliatelle: she's really going at it!

    You could add a "hard" after the "it" in some contexts, too, as an intensifier.
     

    You little ripper!

    Senior Member
    Australian English
    To go for it hammer and tongs might be another translation.

    I thought they were on loudspeaker. He's really going for it hammer and tongs!
    Look at that girl with the plate of tagliatelle! She's really going for it hammer and tongs!
     
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