Das Hotel bleibt/steht hinter der Apotheke.

Discussion in 'Deutsch (German)' started by Feuer Krieger, Aug 12, 2012.

  1. Feuer Krieger Member

    Rio de Janeiro - Brazil
    Portuguese - Brazil
    Hello, fellows

    I'm having some trouble using bleiben and stehen(or liegen). Bleiben seems to mean "to stay" and stehen seems to mean "to stand". But in German, could I use both of them indifferently (as shown in the title)?

    Thank you
     
  2. djweaverbeaver Senior Member

    English Atlanta, GA USA
    Hi,

    I'm not a native German speaker, but I don't think you can use either "stehen" or "bleiben". Das Hotel liegt hinter der Apotheke. Liegen is what one associates with geographical locations. I know you can't go wrong with sich befinden: Das Hotel befindet sich hinter der Apotheke. Now, I'm not 100% sure about what I say on about stehen, but I do know that bleiben wouldn't work. I'd wait just to see what the natives say before taking my word for this though.
     
  3. Feuer Krieger Member

    Rio de Janeiro - Brazil
    Portuguese - Brazil
    Hmm, I figured out that, once "das Hotel" is a building, it would be more likely to use stehen once it indicates that something stays on a vertical manner. Nevertheless, if you are right abotu using liegen, the main question remains: I don't really know how to differenciate the usage of both bleiben and liegen. Do you know why bleiben wouldn't work?

    Thanks
     
  4. Demiurg

    Demiurg Senior Member

    Germany
    German
    djweaverbeaver is right:

    Das Hotel liegt hinter der Apotheke. :tick:
    Das Hotel befindet sich hinter der Apotheke. :tick:
    Das Hotel steht hinter der Apotheke. :tick:
    Das Hotel bleibt hinter der Apotheke. :cross:

    "bleiben" (to stay/remain) doesn't make sense here.
     
  5. Gernot Back

    Gernot Back Senior Member

    Cologne, Germany
    German - Germany
    I don't agree that this sentence would be wrong per se.
    E.g. in the context of the board of directors of some hotel chain or some municipal planning committee it might be their decision to say:

    Das Hotel bleibt hinter der Apotheke.:tick:

    ... and not to look for a different location for the hotel.

    On the other hand:
    ... sounds strange if the hotel hasn't fallen into disrepair and is about to collapse or if the company running the hotel "stands behind" the pharmacy in the metaphorical sence of supporting or owning it as a dummy firm to wash money from some illegal activity within the hotel.
     
    Last edited: Aug 12, 2012
  6. Demiurg

    Demiurg Senior Member

    Germany
    German

    I think "stehen" is possible, especially for taller buildings:
     
  7. Gernot Back

    Gernot Back Senior Member

    Cologne, Germany
    German - Germany
    Yes, but in the case of a cathedral or Mozart's house of birth there is no possible confusion between the building and a homonymous institution acting in a deliberate way, such that stehen hinter etw./jmdm. could be interpreted in a metaphorical sense of support or ownership.
     
  8. Captain Lars

    Captain Lars Senior Member

    Ducatus Montensis
    Deutsch (D)
    Das Hotel steht hinter der Apotheke means

    a) The hotel (building) is located behind the pharmacy -> the emphasis lies on the building structure

    b) The hotel (company) (secretly) runs the pharmacy. -> The subject must have been introduced explicitly before to get that meaning.

    Of course, like Gernot rightly pointed out, Das Hotel bleibt hinter der Apotheke is possible, but, like in example b), it must be clear in the conversation before that sentence is uttered, that the hotel is not moving to another place.

    Stehen can not be used sinonimously to bleiben. Bleiben is more "to remain" than "to stay".
     
  9. djweaverbeaver Senior Member

    English Atlanta, GA USA
    Hi,

    In English, it's synonymous(ly) with something.
     
  10. Captain Lars

    Captain Lars Senior Member

    Ducatus Montensis
    Deutsch (D)
    Thanks. :)
     
  11. Dan2

    Dan2 Senior Member

    US
    English (US)
    I think there's a typo here ("stay" for "stand"?) - in most contexts "remain" and "stay" are synonyms:
    He remained/stayed in Europe while the rest of his family went to America.
    She remained/stayed a teacher.
    They remained/stayed calm.
     
  12. berndf Moderator

    Geneva
    German (Germany)
    Not per se but certainly in the context of this thread. Stehen und bleiben are certainly not interchangable in here. The meaning of the sentences Das Hotel bleibt hinter der Apotheke and Das Hotel steht hinter der Apotheke are not even remotely similar.
     
  13. berndf Moderator

    Geneva
    German (Germany)
    I think, he meant what he wrote. To stay to some extend still has the ambiguity of its origin, the Latin verb stare, the meaning of which can range from to be at a place (e.g. in He stayed at the hotel for two nights) to to remain. The German bleiben does not have this ambiguity it only means to remain.

    More so, I even suspect that the original question was probably motivated by comparison to the Romance stare (estar in Portuguese) and its range of meanings. Otherwise it would not be understandable how you could possibly associate the two verbs bleiben and stehen because in German there is no overlap in meaning.
     
  14. Gernot Back

    Gernot Back Senior Member

    Cologne, Germany
    German - Germany
    No, I think the question was motivated by the Portuguese verb ficar, which is a blanket term in Portuguse and means -among other meanings- to stay and to be located at the same time.

    http://en.dicios.com/pten/ficar
    http://de.bab.la/woerterbuch/portugiesisch-deutsch/ficar
     
  15. Dan2

    Dan2 Senior Member

    US
    English (US)
    I wrote "most contexts" with exactly the hotel-stay reading in mind. To me (whatever the pre-Middle English history; that was before my time...), this is a special, extended use of "stay" and doesn't detract from the basic synonymy of "remain" and "stay". Note furthermore that many dictionaries, including WR, give "stay" as the first definition of "bleiben".

    So you're right that "to stay" has a meaning not covered by "to remain", but I still feel it's a mistake to archive unchallenged the suggestion that "stay" is not (in most cases) an excellent translation of "bleiben".
     

Share This Page

Loading...