Date prisa no vaya a ser que se te queme la comida

Mustermisstler

Senior Member
Spanish.Spain
First of all I wanna wish you all a Happy New Year .
Now we keep on learning with this useful website , there you have my new doubt :

I wanna translate "Date prisa no vaya a ser que se te queme la comida" into english.

My attempt : Hurry up just in case the food gets burned.


Thanks
 
  • sound shift

    Senior Member
    English - England
    Hurry or you'll burn what you're cooking.
    Be quick or ........ .

    In case
    no encaja aquí.

    I've bought some cakes from the shops in case you burn the ones you're cooking: En la tienda compré algunos pastelitos por el caso de que se te quemen aquellos que estás preparando.
     

    sunrise25

    Banned
    Argentina
    My attempts:

    Hurry up, otherwise the food will get burned.
    Hurry up so that the food doesn´t get burned.

    The expression get burned is correct here. For instance, you can say: Se ha quemado la carne: the meat got burned.
    The "se" implies a pronominal verb in Spanish that requires the use of the grammar construction get + the past participle verb burned in English.


    Burned is in American English.
    You must use burnt in British English.
     

    FromPA

    Senior Member
    USA English
    Feliz año nuevo a todos:
    I understand "Date prisa" and "que se te queme la comida", but can someone please explain the sense of "no vaya a ser"? I'm also unclear on the connection between "Date prisa" and "no vaya a ser"; should there be a comma between them or should there be a "que" in front of "no vaya a ser"? The construction has me a little confused.
     

    ghorganite

    Senior Member
    English- American
    no vaya a ser que- means "Just in case"

    ponte un delantal no vaya a ser que te manche esa camisa
    put on an apron just in case you stain that shirt

    date prisa no vaya a ser que se te queme la comida
    hurry up, go! Just in case if the food is burning

    Understood now?
     

    Quiensepa

    Senior Member
    U.S. English
    Get your ass in gear or your food will be toast!

    First of all I wanna wish you all a Happy New Year .
    Now we keep on learning with this useful website , there you have my new doubt :
    Mustermisstler: Primero, ¡Feliz Año Nuevo a tí también! Ojalá no te moleste si te corrige algo. "doubt" no sirve bien de "duda" en tu frase. Sería más correcto decir "here you have my new question". Más natural aún:

    Here is my latest challenge/problem/difficulty/brain twister/tough nut to crack.
    Here is a new one I'm trying to figure out.
    Another tough one for me is this one.
    Heeeeeeelp!:D
     
    Last edited by a moderator:

    Mustermisstler

    Senior Member
    Spanish.Spain
    Mustermisstler: Primero, ¡Feliz Año Nuevo a tí también! Ojalá no te moleste si te corrige algo. "doubt" no sirve bien de "duda" en tu frase. Sería más correcto decir "here you have my new question". Más natural aún:

    Here is my latest challenge/problem/difficulty/brain twister/tough nut to crack.
    Here is a new one I'm trying to figure out.
    Another tough one for me is this one.
    Heeeeeeelp!:D
    No me molesta en absoluto que me corrijas sino todo lo contrario.
    I'm not at all bothered by you correcting me far from it. I'm here to learn and to share. I'm improving a lot with you guys.
    Now here is my bit of help for you:
    you wrote : Ojalá no te moleste si te corrige algo.
    corrige is not used with the first singular person (yo) but with the third (él)
    It would be more correct to say : "Ojalá no te moleste si te corrijo algo" or alternatively "Ojalá no te moleste que te corrija algo".
     

    gengo

    Senior Member
    American English
    no vaya a ser que- means "Just in case"

    ponte un delantal no vaya a ser que te manche esa camisa
    put on an apron just in case you stain that shirt

    date prisa no vaya a ser que se te queme la comida
    hurry up, go! Just in case if the food is burning
    We can't use "just in case" as you have above. I see that you are a native English speaker, but I must disagree. Just in case means "in the event that (something) happens," but that is illogical in your examples, because the action of the first clause prevents the action of the second clause, so that second action cannot happen.

    Ponte un delantal no vaya a ser que te manche esa camisa.
    Put on an apron so you won't stain that shirt.
    but:
    Put on an apron, just in case you spill something.

    Date prisa no vaya a ser que se te queme la comida
    Hurry up, or else the food will burn!
     
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