daylight out of that fool

Priss

Senior Member
Ecuador/ Spanish
Hi!
I just found this expression: "daylight out of that fool", and I just can't understand its meaning.
I would appreciate any help...
I found the expression in this sentence:
"Who'd believe the daylight out of that fool, reading magazines with one hand stuffing his face with another.."
 
  • panjandrum

    Lapsed Moderator
    English-Ireland (top end)
    I think you are grouping the words wrongly.

    Who'd believe the daylight out of that fool ....

    I wouldn't believe the daylight from him.
    I wouldn't believe a word he says.

    Where are you finding these rather quaint expressions?
     

    Priss

    Senior Member
    Ecuador/ Spanish
    I just have an Irish friend, and he is always saying things like that. :p
    Thank you Pjandrum!
     

    gotitadeleche

    Senior Member
    U.S.A. English
    "Who'd believe the daylight out of that fool, reading magazines with one hand stuffing his face with another"

    I´ve never heard it used like that. In the US we might say, "If that fool don´t straighten up, I´m gonna knock the livin´ daylight outta him!"
     

    MichaelC

    New Member
    English
    It's proper usage would be like this: I just scared the daylight out of that fool. Or you could say, "Damn he scared the day light out of me !"

    Meaning that you scared him to death !! Scared him really BAD !!

    The usage you are describing "Who'd believe the day light out of that fool", is not correct.
     

    JamesM

    Senior Member
    It's proper usage would be like this: I just scared the daylight out of that fool. Or you could say, "Damn he scared the day light out of me !"

    Meaning that you scared him to death !! Scared him really BAD !!

    The usage you are describing "Who'd believe the day light out of that fool", is not correct.
    Hi, MichaelC. Welcome to the forum! Just a note... expressions vary from country to country. Panjandrum, who is from Ireland, has pointed out in a previous post that the original poster's sentence is very close to an Irish expression. It might not be "correct" to U.S. ears, but it could very well be correct to the ears of other English speakers around the world.

    If nothing else, I've learned on this forum that my experience is far too limited in most cases to make any pronouncement of what's actually "correct." :)
     

    panjandrum

    Lapsed Moderator
    English-Ireland (top end)
    Ah, but this isn't the same kind of daylight. That kind is your eyes, or similarly vital part of your anatomy - hence having the living daylights beaten out of you is a fairly traumatic experience.

    This kind of daylight is not the same at all, this is simply daylight ...

    I went to see if I could find some source to confirm, but it seems that this is not a very common expression - at least, it's not common on the internet. There is one example :D
    Mr. Colley: [...] As a result of these inquiries they are satisfied that there is no justification for complaints about discrimination, punitive action or bad treatment in relation to the man in question.
    Dr. O'Donovan: Does the Minister believe that?
    Mr. Colley: Yes.
    Dr. O'Donovan: That is very good of him. I can tell him something else: I would not believe the daylight from them.
    Dáil Éireann - Volume 256 - 02 November, 1971
     

    gotitadeleche

    Senior Member
    U.S.A. English
    Ah, but this isn't the same kind of daylight. That kind is your eyes, or similarly vital part of your anatomy - hence having the living daylights beaten out of you is a fairly traumatic experience.

    This kind of daylight is not the same at all, this is simply daylight ...

    I went to see if I could find some source to confirm, but it seems that this is not a very common expression - at least, it's not common on the internet. There is one example :D
    Dáil Éireann - Volume 256 - 02 November, 1971
    Thanks panj for opening our eyes to the daylight!:D
     

    Priss

    Senior Member
    Ecuador/ Spanish
    I don't understand, I thought "daylight" is like sun light. Is there another use for this word?:confused:
     

    MissFit

    Senior Member
    So, to translate this interesting Irish expression into an AE frame of mind, would "light," in this case, be something like "the light of knowledge/enlightenment/revelation/sense or the "spark" of intelligence?

    Would this be an adequate paraphrase?
    "Who would believe any so-called intelligence that comes from that fool..."
     

    CatStar

    Senior Member
    English, Ireland
    I don't understand, I thought "daylight" is like sun light. Is there another use for this word?:confused:

    No it´s just that the phrase beat the living daylights out of someone and the way daylight is used in your sentence differ.

    In the living daylights it refers to life
    In your sentence daylight refers to credibility.

    Hope I haven´t confused you even more now!

    Cat
     

    gaer

    Senior Member
    US-English
    It's proper usage would be like this: I just scared the daylight out of that fool. Or you could say, "Damn he scared the day light out of me !"

    Meaning that you scared him to death !! Scared him really BAD !!
    "Damn he scared the daylights out of me!"

    "Daylights", not "daylight" or "day light". :)
     

    . 1

    Banned
    Australian Australia
    This sounds similar to an old Aussie expression.
    I wouldn't believe him if he told me it was daylight outside unless I checked for myself.
    or
    I wouldn't believe him if he told me the sun had risen unless I checked for myself.

    This is a reference to an habitual liar who will lie about anything and everything including lies that can be easily and clearly identified as being lies.

    .,,
     

    . 1

    Banned
    Australian Australia
    As many as the day is long.

    A bloke could threaten to beat the living daylights out of me.
    This would be a threat to knock me senseless, or put me to sleep. To turn my daylights into darkness.

    Don Bradman was the greatest cricketer to ever play the game and daylight was second.
    This is a reference to the absolute superiority of don Bradman as a cricketer that if it was a race he would be first and then there would be a long space of nothing but daylight before the next best cricketer arrived.

    I am sure that others could come up with more.

    .,,
     

    panjandrum

    Lapsed Moderator
    English-Ireland (top end)
    [...]
    I wouldn't believe him if he told me it was daylight outside unless I checked for myself.
    or
    I wouldn't believe him if he told me the sun had risen unless I checked for myself.
    [...]
    That is exactly the kind of sense that I believe this expression is tapping into.
     

    panjandrum

    Lapsed Moderator
    English-Ireland (top end)
    Here is another example:
    Who or what are we to believe? The answer is neither of them and nothing. The people have learned one salutary lesson, that the Taoiseach will attempt to do whatever it takes to have his Government, in whatever incarnation, returned for a third term in office. For that reason, the people cannot be expected to believe daylight from the Taoiseach.
    Wednesday, 29 September 2004
     

    gaer

    Senior Member
    US-English
    That is exactly the kind of sense that I believe this expression is tapping into.
    "Who'd believe the daylight out of that fool, reading magazines with one hand stuffing his face with another.."

    "Who'd believe 'one word that comes out of the mouth of that fool', reading magazines with one hand stuffing his face with another.."

    Close? That's about what I got out of it.

    I've never heard "daylight" used in this way but really like it. Very colorful!

    Gaer
     

    Priss

    Senior Member
    Ecuador/ Spanish
    Thank you for all your examples, they helped me to understand the expression I posted "daylight out of that fool"...
    Thank you for all you've done and have a nice day! :) :p
     

    sloopjc

    Senior Member
    UK English
    Wait! The fool on the hill sees the sun going down, and the eyes in his... O, never mind.
     
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