Dead chuffed

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Dimme

Senior Member
Greek
Hello everyone. Could someone tell me what the underlined, coloured expression means? Thanks.

"I was dead, dead chuffed." he said. "It was brilliant. Being a Yorkshireman, there's not many of us guys that get to this position. I just feel quite honoured."
 
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  • ewie

    Senior Member
    English English
    Hello Dimme ~ it just means very very pleased ~ it's actually in the WordRef dictionary at the top of the page:) I'd classify it as 'not quite slang but very very informal'.
     

    JamesM

    Senior Member
    I had never thought of "stoked" and "chuffed" together, but that seems to be a perfect equivalent! I love this board. There's something new to learn (or have connected for you) every day.

    Just checking one thing... "stoked" means excited and happy, "keyed up" about something. Is that what "chuffed" means? Sometimes it seems that "chuffed" seems to mean "proud" in a way. That may just be my misinterpretation of the context.
     

    ewie

    Senior Member
    English English
    I'd never thought of chuffed and stoked together either, James ... because I'd never heard of stoked until today!

    For me chuffed is absolutely synonymous with pleased ~ if there's any trace of 'pleased with oneself', it's infinitesimal.
     

    JamesM

    Senior Member
    Maybe they aren't synonymous, then. "I was totally stoked when I heard that I would get to go to Paris" would mean "excited and pleased". Does "chuffed" mean "excited" at all?
     

    Thomas Tompion

    Senior Member
    English - England
    Not really. I agree with Ewie that it means almost exactly the same as pleased. I detect no whiff of pleased with oneself, or of excitement, other than is naturally present in pleasure.
     

    sound shift

    Senior Member
    English - England
    There's a large overlap between "chuffed" and "pleased", but I don't think they are interchangeable. At least, I personally wouldn't say "I'm chuffed that the government has finally decided to do something about it"; I would use "pleased" in place of "chuffed" here.
     

    sound shift

    Senior Member
    English - England
    Sorry, I wasn't commenting on your post, Thomas, but on Ewie's claim that "pleased" and "chuffed" are "absolutely synonymous". I don't think they are, and I think the difference is one of meaninig as well as register.
     

    sound shift

    Senior Member
    English - England
    I think "chuffed" applies only to an event that directly affects the person who is the subject, Thomas:-

    "She was chuffed to receive a letter from him";
    "I was chuffed to be given 'A' grades in all subjects" (an unlikely scenario ;));

    etc,

    but not

    "I am chuffed that the weak pound is, supposedly, helping exporters." :cross: This does not concern me directly; I would use "pleased" in place of "chuffed" here.

    Perhaps this is just deviant personal usage. :confused:
     

    cuchuflete

    Senior Member
    EEUU-inglés
    It became popular in the sixties in California, I believe.
    It (stoked) never made it East of the Mississippi, it seems. We just don't take well to
    those surfer expressions.

    I understand 'chuffed', from the way my BE acquaintances use it, as informal. It's an enthusiastic expression of pleasure. I look to ewie, Thomas, Sound shift and others to comment on this. I've never heard a BE speaker say that they are chuffed or dead chuffed in a soft monotone. It's always an energetic statement.
     

    sound shift

    Senior Member
    English - England
    I learned the word "stoked" from one Henry Rollins, who said he was "stoked" to receive a letter from Wayne Kramer (of MC5 fame). Rollins was originally from Washington, DC, but he moved to California ....

    I agree with you, cuchu, that "chuffed" is an enthusiastic expression of pleasure. I think it also contains an element of pride.
     

    ewie

    Senior Member
    English English
    I think "chuffed" applies only to an event that directly affects the person who is the subject, Thomas:-

    "She was chuffed to receive a letter from him";
    "I was chuffed to be given 'A' grades in all subjects" (an unlikely scenario ;));

    etc,

    but not

    "I am chuffed that the weak pound is, supposedly, helping exporters." :cross: This does not concern me directly; I would use "pleased" in place of "chuffed" here.

    Perhaps this is just deviant personal usage. :confused:
    I take your point, SS ... well, kind of. I'd still say chuffed and pleased mean exactly the same thing (albeit chuffed is a bit more enthusiastic than pleased, as Cuchie says): the only difference is when and where you use them.
     
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    Cypherpunk

    Senior Member
    US, English
    I live just west of the Mississippi, and I've traveled extensively throughout the South. I've heard 'stoked' in most of the region, at one time or another. It is very much a Gen X phrase, but it is often used by teenagers, too.
    I have often heard it as a synonym for 'pumped' or 'pumped up', meaning very excited, and the person often provides additional emphasis by gesture or body movement.
     
    In BE, 'chuffed' has, as well, an opposite meaning (displeased, etc.). Is that seen much, still, in BE? To my AE ear, the negative is what first comes to mind.

    meaning - Chuffed - happy or unhappy? - English Language & Usage ...

    The OED says chuffed is originally military slang, and has both meanings. The "pleased, satisfied" meaning has four quotations from 1957 to 1967, whilst the "displeased, disgruntled" meaning has two, in 1960 and 1964.

    ====
    NOTE:

    Brief discussion in another thread:
    Can a chuff be chuffed?
     
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    Chasint

    Senior Member
    English - England
    In BE, 'chuffed' has, as well, an opposite meaning (displeased, etc.). Is that seen much, still, in BE? To my AE ear, the negative is what first comes to mind.

    meaning - Chuffed - happy or unhappy? - English Language & Usage ...
    Having clicked on that link, I think you will get exactly the same answers here.

    I personally have only ever heard the positive version. It came as a complete surprise that the expression could have a negative sense.

    EDIT

    However

    If someone spoke to me about the chuffing buses always being late, for example, I would assume it was a euphemism for f*cking. In fact I have heard that negative usage.
     
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    heypresto

    Senior Member
    English - England
    Nor me.

    Chambers Dictionary also lists the 'disgruntled' meaning, but I've never seen or heard it before today. Collins lists it too, but marks it as AE.
     
    One Canadian in the Stack thread cited reported his or her experience like mine:

    In Canada we use this word as a negative: "I was really chuffed that I didn't get that raise."
    ======================

    My impression (AE speaker, long resident in Canada) that the negative turns up--occasionally-- mostly in US, Canada, and maybe Australia, not the UK.
     

    JamesM

    Senior Member
    One Canadian in the Stack thread cited reported his or her experience like mine:

    In Canada we use this word as a negative: "I was really chuffed that I didn't get that raise."
    ======================

    My impression (AE speaker, long resident in Canada) that the negative turns up--occasionally-- mostly in US, Canada, and maybe Australia, not the UK.
    "Chuffed" isn't a word I've ever heard from an American. As a negative, "chapped" would probably work in your example.
     

    Oddmania

    Senior Member
    French
    I'm not familiar with chuffed as a negative word either, but I have heard dischuffed (a couple of times) and gutted (much more often) from English and Irish speakers to express dissatisfaction. I think an American speaker would be more likely to say "bummed out", probably.
     

    You little ripper!

    Senior Member
    Australian English
    It must be at least twenty years or so since I last heard the word 'chuffed'. I didn't know it had a negative meaning. 'Stoked' was pretty popular here in the sixties and seventies.
     

    PaulQ

    Senior Member
    UK
    English - England
    In BE, 'chuffed' has, as well, an opposite meaning (displeased, etc.). Is that seen much, still, in BE? To my AE ear, the negative is what first comes to mind.

    meaning - Chuffed - happy or unhappy? - English Language & Usage ...

    The OED says chuffed is originally military slang, and has both meanings. The "pleased, satisfied" meaning has four quotations from 1957 to 1967, whilst the "displeased, disgruntled" meaning has two, in 1960 and 1964.

    ====
    NOTE:

    Brief discussion in another thread:
    Can a chuff be chuffed?
    I was reading down the list of posts, waiting for that to appear. Yes: I have heard this use a few times - it is rare, and I think, regional. It caused a lot of surprised. I can't recall the exact scenario but it was along the lines of "I was really chuffed when he died. I cried."

    OED:
    a. Pleased, satisfied.
    1957 P. Wildeblood Main Chance ix. 163 Aren't you pleased? There's not many kids of your age what owns a factory. You ought to be dead chuffed about it.
    1967 Crescendo May 6 (advt.) I cannot express too much just how ‘chuffed’ I am with the drums.

    b. Displeased, disgruntled.
    1960 D. Storey This Sporting Life i. ii. 59 I felt pretty chuffed with myself1.
    1964 C. Dale Other People viii. 158 Don't let on they're after you, see, or she'll be dead chuffed, see? She don' like the law.

    1The context makes it clearer in the book: This Sporting Life
     

    natkretep

    Moderato con anima (English Only)
    English (Singapore/UK), basic Chinese
    I know about the negative version but have only encountered the positive version of chuffed - often intensified as in the original example dead chuffed or chuffed to bits.
     

    Thomas Tompion

    Senior Member
    English - England
    I know about the negative version but have only encountered the positive version of chuffed - often intensified as in the original example dead chuffed or chuffed to bits.
    You've reminded me, Natkretep.

    I had a friend who was doing National Service. He said that on his first day in the food queue, the squaddie in front of him asked what was for afters, on hearing that it was 'duff', he said 'Oooo, chuuffed to fuck; I'm a bugger for duff'.

    As he said it, it tripped off the tongue.
     
    You've reminded me, Natkretep.

    I had a friend who was doing National Service. He said that on his first day in the food queue, the squaddie in front of him asked what was for afters, on hearing that it was 'duff', he said 'Oooo, chuuffed to fuck; I'm a bugger for duff'.

    As he said it, it tripped off the tongue.

    Is this a correct translation: "I'm pleased to pieces; I love this [kind of] pudding."
    (I'm assuming the positive sense, if perhaps hyperbolic and/or tongue in cheek.)
     

    Thomas Tompion

    Senior Member
    English - England
    And that's a positive use too, TT! :D
    Yes, indeed.

    I've never heard chuffed in anything other than a positive sense, though, like everything else, it could be used ironically.

    I should have mentioned that the u-sounds in every word spoken by the duff-lover are almost identical, taking into account the demotic nature of the man's normal way of speaking.
     
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    Trochfa

    Senior Member
    UK
    English - England
    Just to chorus the boring uninamity of the BrE speakers, I've definitely only ever heard 'chuffed' used in a positive way. It was certainly a surprise to discover that anyone used it negatively. :)

    That's why Paul's quote of
    "I was really chuffed when he died. I cried."
    seems utterly bizarre, unless you absolutely hated that person and were overjoyed. If I heard someone say it I would understand what they meant by context, but might have wrongly assumed that they just didn't know what 'chuffed' actually meant.
     

    JulianStuart

    Senior Member
    English (UK then US)
    Like 'couth', I suppose. I'd point out too that sentences like "I was too chuffin' knackered to go to work the next day" {I believe it's correct BE}confuse the picture.
    I'd never heard if "chuffin'" before and would take as the euphemism mentioned above with its f and u sounds
    If someone spoke to me about the chuffing buses always being late, for example, I would assume it was a euphemism for f*cking. In fact I have heard that negative usage.
    and would not immediately link it to the word chuffed. So I would not find it "confusing" but I can see what a non-BE speaker trying to get to the bottom of this might be:D
     

    Trochfa

    Senior Member
    UK
    English - England
    I agree with Julian. In BrE, Chuffin' is not the same as chuffed it is just another word used to take the place of any swear word.

    You have at least three types of this type of word in British English, all used for different purposes:
    Chuffed and dead chuffed, informally used respectively to mean 'very pleased' and 'extremely pleased'.

    Chuffin', just used in the same way as other stand-in words for swear words such as bloomin', blinkin' and flippin'.
    You can tell it's not a word associated with meaning 1. above because you can say things such as I was livid this morning because the chuffin' train was late. I associate this word mainly with the north of England, which may possibly be why Julian wasn't familiar with it. It seems to be known elsewhere now, especially in these days where TV presenters have regional accents. I especially associate it with comedians such as Peter Kay and Paddy McGuiness from Bolton in Lancashire.
    Peter Kay - Wikipedia
    Paddy McGuinness - Wikipedia

    However, I can't imagine anyone saying I was chuffin' on its own in BrE unless they are five years old and have been playing choo-choo trains! :)

    You also have chuff off as in Just chuff off mate! where it can clearly be seen as a stand-in for a swear word.
    chuff off | Definition of chuff off in English by Oxford Dictionaries

    >>>>
     
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