dead end

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AndrasBP

Senior Member
Hungarian
Hello,

What do you call a 'dead end' (a street with no exit) in your language?

In Hungarian we say 'zsákutca' /ˈʒaːkutsːɒ/, which literally means 'sack street'.
 
  • TheCrociato91

    Senior Member
    Italian - Northern Italy
    Italian

    Strada senza uscita (street with no exit).
    We also have the phrase vicolo cieco (blind alley) but this is often used with a metaphorical meaning (an impasse, or a situation with no way out).
     

    Penyafort

    Senior Member
    Catalan (Catalonia), Spanish (Spain)
    In Catalan, I know three ways:

    carreró sense sortida (or carreró que no passa) = 'alley without exit'​
    cul-de-sac = 'sack bottom'​
    atzucac = from Arabic az-zuqaaq 'the alleyway'​
     

    Perseas

    Senior Member
    The Greek word for "dead end" is "αδιέξοδο" [a∂iékso∂o]. It is a nominalized adjective: alpha privative + διέξοδος=way out, outlet, exit.
    The word 'sokak', derived from the same Arabic word, is also used in Turkish and South Slavic languages.
    In Greek also, and it's very common: σοκάκι (small and narrow road).
     
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    Penyafort

    Senior Member
    Catalan (Catalonia), Spanish (Spain)
    Is 'atzucac' used in Catalan only or is there a Spanish equivalent, too?
    No, as far as I know. In fact, the only word for dead end in Spanish I know is callejón sin salida.

    Catalan has fewer Arabisms than Spanish or Portuguese but there are too some Arabisms in Catalan you won't find in either Spanish or Portuguese.
     

    rarabara

    Senior Member
    Turkish
    we say "çıkmaz sokak" in turkish and something like ریا ب را or ریا ب دەر in kurdish maybe ,in some other dialect of kurdish be ریاە با بارات (in very unpleased cases (e.g.: when big problems are thought/considered/predicted to happen(this might be more common in syrian dialect))
     
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    Armas

    Senior Member
    Finnish
    Finnish: umpikuja where umpi- means closed, blocked, without any openings and kuja "alley"
     

    swift

    Senior Member
    Spanish – Costa Rica (Valle Central)
    In fact, the only word for dead end in Spanish I know is callejón sin salida.
    There’s also “adarve”, which I only know from dictionaries and literature. Here’s the WR entry: dead end. “Calle” (feminine) instead of “callejón” (masculine) is also possible. :)
    We call it 'blind street/road'
    Ok, but what’s the Polish phrase? 😜

    In Spanish, “calle ciega” could also work in some places.
     
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    Penyafort

    Senior Member
    Catalan (Catalonia), Spanish (Spain)
    There’s also “adarve”, which I only know from dictionaries and literature.
    Interesting! I knew the word but to me, an adarve was simply the narrow corridor on top of a wall, from where guards are watching over (I don't know how it is called in English). I didn't know it could also be used for a dead end.
     

    Welsh_Sion

    Senior Member
    Welsh - Northern
    Interesting! I knew the word but to me, an adarve was simply the narrow corridor on top of a wall, from where guards are watching over (I don't know how it is called in English). I didn't know it could also be used for a dead end.
    adarve = rampart, parapet, chemin de ronde ... they all see to be 'English' words to what you allude to.
     

    L'irlandais

    Senior Member
    Ireland: English-speaking ♂
    In Ireland, as for rest of UK the Cul de sac road sign is fairly widespread.

    In the Irish language we say
    bealach caoch literally way blind
    bóthar caoch = road blind
    clós ~ = blind alley

    Curiously, also exists for pedestrians
    Cosán caoch - blind path (still the inversion in Irish)
     
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    nimak

    Senior Member
    Macedonian
    Macedonian, Serbian, Croatian, Slovenian, Bulgarian:


    we say "çıkmaz sokak" in turkish
    In Macedonian, Serbian, and Croatian is used the Turkism:
    from Ottoman Turkish kör sokak = lit. "blind street", "blind alley"

    kör, from Ottoman Turkish كور‎ (kör), from Persian کور‎ (kur)
    sokak, f
    rom Ottoman Turkish سوقاق‎ (sokak), from Arabic زُقَاق‎ (zuqāq)

    'Ślepa ulica', which means 'blind street'
    • Macedonian, Serbian and Slovenian also use: слепа улица / slepa ulica
    • Croatian: slijepa ulica
    • Bulgarian: задънена улица (zadŭnena ulica), and rarely сляпа улица (sljapa ulica)
     
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    rarabara

    Senior Member
    Turkish
    from Ottoman Turkish kör sokak = lit. "blind street", "blind alley"

    kör, from Ottoman Turkish كور‎ (kör), from Persian کور‎ (kur)
    sokak, f
    rom Ottoman Turkish سوقاق‎ (sokak), from Arabic زُقَاق‎ (zuqāq)
    "blind street" ("kör sokak") is no longer used in turkey for that aim. but if you use jargon ,then no problem to use it.
     
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