dead from/of

JungKim

Senior Member
Korean
(1) He is dead from a viral infection.
(2) He is dead of a viral infection.

I came across (1) and was wondering if (2) is possible. The latter I initially thought was awkward.
But after reading it several times, it kind of grew on me. :D
Hence, this question.
 
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  • Tazzler

    Senior Member
    American English
    I prefer "of" here. But honestly "be dead of" is not that common a turn of phrase anymore. People would say "have died of/from". Here I see little difference between the two prepositions, but I'm sure it has been discussed elsewhere.
     

    JungKim

    Senior Member
    Korean
    Thank you both.
    I did my research and couldn't find any "dead of/from" thread. Nor was I sure whether I can simply use the same distinction made for "die of/from" in the current situation.
    My understanding of "die of/from" is that they are generally interchangeable although "die of" may be preferable in front of a more direct cause of death such as a disease.
     
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