dead to rights

  • mariska

    Member
    Spain-Spanish
    - She's heading south.
    - My men will blitz the area immediately.
    - No, they won't.
    - You have them dead to rights, and you don't want to take her?
     

    Masood

    Senior Member
    British English
    Thank you. I don't know if 'she' and 'her' refer to a woman or (militarily speaking), a convoy or ship, for example.

    Anyway, I think 'dead to right' means 'to have cornered' or 'to have trapped'. So, it might be 'ella (¿el enemigo?) está arrinconada, ¿y no quieres conseguirla/destruirla?

    Just my opinion.
    Cheers
     

    mariska

    Member
    Spain-Spanish
    Thank you. I don't know if 'she' and 'her' refer to a woman or (militarily speaking), a convoy or ship, for example.

    Anyway, I think 'dead to right' means 'to have cornered' or 'to have trapped'. So, it might be 'ella (¿el enemigo?) está arrinconada, ¿y no quieres conseguirla/destruirla?

    Just my opinion.
    Cheers


    Thank you.
     

    velero

    Senior Member
    English
    dead to rights—In the very act of making an error or committing a crime. The police caught the thief dead to rights with my silverware. The American Heritage Dictionary

    dead to rights
    red-handed, with no chance of escape or excuse. <had him dead to rights for the robbery> Merriam-Webster

    dead to rights {adv. phr.}, {informal} Without a chance of escaping blame; proven wrong. Mother had Bob dead to rights, because she caught him with his hand in the cookie jar. Dictionary of American Idioms

    catch/have sb dead to rights (British bang to rights) to have enough proof to show that someone has done something wrong. I was driving way above the speed limit and the police radar caught me dead to rights. Cambridge International Dictionary
     
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