death proof

piotr1980

Senior Member
Polish
Hello

Can we call something that it's ''death proof''. I refer the the last Tarantini's movie.

This car is death proof ( do we use this expression or it was only used in his movie?)

Many thanks
Piotr
 
  • mylasalle

    Senior Member
    English - Philippines
    Hello Piotr

    Though not too common at all, yes it can be used.
    And knowing how screenplays in Tarantino movies find their way into everyday English, I wouldn't be surprised if I hear it being used more often.
     

    AWordLover

    Senior Member
    USA English
    Hello

    Can we call something that it's ''death proof''. I refer the the last Tarantini's movie.

    This car is death proof ( do we use this expression or it was only used in his movie?)

    Many thanks
    Piotr
    Here's some help from the dictionary.
    proof
    adj.
    1. Fully or successfully resistant; impervious. Often used in combination: waterproof watches; a fireproof cellar door.
     

    Matching Mole

    Senior Member
    England, English
    do we use this expression or it was only used in his movie?
    Although someone may have thought of the phrase before, I would say yes, it's a novel formation on a familiar usage, e.g. tamper-proof, child-proof and of course water-proof. Creative English speakers do this all the time to make their speech or writing startling, humorous, ironic, etc. If the new formation is memorable it will often catch on.
     

    Nikined

    Senior Member
    Russian
    can this phrase have meaning "proof of death"? And does it sound (in "tarantino" meaning) awkward in normal, real-life language?
     
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