Deceased's/Deceased'

fatfat116

Senior Member
Chinese
Hello everyone. Would someone tell me which is correct in the sentence? Thank you.

He is the Deceased's son.
He is the Deceased' son.

I sometimes see people use Deceased'.
 
  • sdgraham

    Senior Member
    USA English
    A problem we have with these kind of messages is that learners often say "I have seen" without ever giving us a clue as to whether the source is from a native speaker.

    There seems to be a plethora of Chinglish web sites these days.
     

    Hermione Golightly

    Senior Member
    British English
    "The son of the deceased" becomes "the deceased's son".
    Perhaps deceased is capitalized in legal documents. I don't know. It's a formal almost euphemistic word, rarely used in everyday writing or speech. I'd use 'dead'.

    The dead woman's/man's son has confirmed her/his identity.
     

    fatfat116

    Senior Member
    Chinese
    Fat, what you may have seen is "the deceased son"--different meaning.

    John is the deceased son of Sir Mallory.
    Sorry. I thought I did not misunderstand. I am not a native. How about the difference between deceased son and deceased's son? Thank you.

    Oh, really? Where?

    And do you ever see people use mother' for mother's, friend' for friend's, book' for book's, etc.?
    A problem we have with these kind of messages is that learners often say "I have seen" without ever giving us a clue as to whether the source is from a native speaker.

    There seems to be a plethora of Chinglish web sites these days.
    I am really sorry. I am a Chinese, and I see it in my job.

    "The son of the deceased" becomes "the deceased's son".
    Perhaps deceased is capitalized in legal documents. I don't know. It's a formal almost euphemistic word, rarely used in everyday writing or speech. I'd use 'dead'.

    The dead woman's/man's son has confirmed her/his identity.
    Thank you for helping. Thanks very much. :)
     
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