Decepcionar = disappoint / let down

  • lcantera

    New Member
    Argentina - Spanish
    Yes, to let someone down means you disappointed them.

    I´d like to ask you this, considering you are a native.

    If I want to say that something won´t be a disappointment, is it good to say: "It won´t let down" ?

    Or necessarily I have to add "me" to the sentence and say "It won´t let ME down" (adding "me" to the sentence)? can I take "me" off ?

    In spanish, I can take "me" off and say: No decepcionará.

    Thanks in advance.
     
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    TitaM

    Member
    UK English/European Spanish
    I´d like to ask you this, considering you are a native.

    If I want to say that something won´t be a disappointment, is it good to say: "It won´t let down" ?

    Or necessarily I have to add "me" to the sentence and say "It won´t let ME down" (adding "me" to the sentence)? can I take "me" off ?

    In spanish, I can take "me" off and say: No decepcionará.

    Thanks in advance.


    Hi,
    First of all, you do have to say who is being let down.
    Secondly, 'It won't let me down' is more like 'no me fallará' so in that context, they're not totally interchangeable. You could use 'to let down' about a person, or a machine for example, but you wouldn't be able to say it when suggesting someone try a good wine, for example.
    Hope that helps,
     

    lcantera

    New Member
    Argentina - Spanish
    Thanks for your help. I was looking for an answer to my question and I found an article of a Boston newspaper in the web and its title was "Michigan won't let down". This article is old and talks about a match of the Michigan football team. Can I translate it like this "Michigan no decepcionara (o fallara)" ?
     

    lcantera

    New Member
    Argentina - Spanish
    I forgot un add this: the title of this article does not say who is being let down... Do you see my point? Thanks.
     
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    Chris K

    Senior Member
    English / US
    Thanks for your help. I was looking for an answer to my question and I found an article of a Boston newspaper in the web and its title was "Michigan won't let down". This article is old and talks about a match of the Michigan football team. Can I translate it like this "Michigan no decepcionara (o fallara)" ?

    It's difficult to say because the web versions of the article I found under that title are truncated, but I think a different idiom is being used. When it says that the Michigan team won't "let down," it means they won't relax even though they're facing a much weaker team. More usual ways of saying this would be "won't let up" or "won't let their guard down."

    In general, when you use "let down" with the meaning of "disappoint," you have to say who won't be let down. Even in advertising, you can say:

    Our beans won't disappoint!

    But you can't say:

    Our beans won't let down!

    You would say:

    Our beans won't let you down!
     

    lcantera

    New Member
    Argentina - Spanish
    Hi! I reallly appreciate your answers TitaM & Chris K, I found ´em very helpful.

    Now I knnow that I have to say who´s being let down when I use it with the meaning of disappoint.

    Thanks a lot from Buenos Aires! :)
     
    It is a interesting question. And after I have read different post I would like to ask you
    a) how I should use let someone down in past tense?
    b) "let someone down" has a different meaning of "being stood up"?
    Thanks
    Juan
     
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    JennyTW

    Senior Member
    English - UK
    Icantera, if you want to say that something won't be a disappointment, then you can also say "it won't be a let-down".

    Just be aware that the two verbs aren't always interchangeable. For example;

    A friend promised to come and help me move house but he let me down at the last minute.
    In this example you couldn't use "disappoint" in the same way.

    Juan, a) "let" has the same form in the past, as you can see from my sample above.

    b) "being stood up" only refers to when someone doesn't turn up to a date or arranged meeting. "Let down" is more general. But you've put one verb in active and the other in passive, so they're referring to th two different parties involved.
    "You let me down badly when you stood me up" or "I was let down badly when I was stood up."
     
    Thanks JenyTW. I was wrong, because I thougth that "let someone down" and "being stood up" meaning the same, don't fulfill a promise. If I understand well your explanation, only "being stood up" have this meaning and "let someone down" is the consecuence of to be stand up, the disappoinment. Thanks again.
    Best regards
    Juan
     

    JennyTW

    Senior Member
    English - UK
    Juan, "to stand someone up" means "dar el plantón", so in passive "I've been stood up" = "me han dado el plantón". Its meaning is límited to this. As a consequence of this, yes, I would feel very let down.
     

    aztlaniano

    Senior Member
    English (Aztlán, US sector)
    When it says that the Michigan team won't "let down," it means they won't relax even though they're facing a much weaker team. More usual ways of saying this would be "won't let up" or "won't let their guard down."
    I agree, after seeing the same (truncated) link. Boston College is a weaker team, but Michigan will not be over-confident, it will play its best game.
     
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