declare behaviors

Discussion in 'English Only' started by Renatrix, Aug 26, 2018.

  1. Renatrix Senior Member

    polski
    In a survey, children are asked how they would behave toward a classmate with disability, if they would play with them, invite them to their birthday party, etc. Is the verb "declare" a good choice to describe what they're saying: Or maybe "state" is better?
    Children declare/state the following behaviors toward a classmate with disability: (...)
    Children declare/state to behave in the following ways toward a classmate with disability: (...)
    Children declare/state they would behave in the following ways toward a classmate with disability: (...)
     
  2. sdgraham

    sdgraham Senior Member

    Oregon, USA
    USA English
    I suggest you not get involved with stilted verbs in an effort to appear erudite.

    Just stick with "say." :)
    "Children say they would behave in the following ways toward a classmate with disability: "(...)
     
  3. PaulQ

    PaulQ Senior Member

    UK
    English - England
    Declare and state are very bad choices, but your question is not very clear. Do you mean "Children, in general, admitted to the following..."
     
  4. Renatrix Senior Member

    polski
    If declare and state are very bad choices, is there a verb in English that means something like "assure, vouch, affirm, pledge that" used in scientific contexts?
    Say seems OK, but I was hoping for a more "academic" verb.
     
  5. PaulQ

    PaulQ Senior Member

    UK
    English - England
    Children are, because of their age, unable to "assure, vouch, affirm, pledge that".

    I did ask for some context - what are you trying to say? It is not at all clear.

    Are you saying
    (i) "Children promised to be <insert behavioural adjectives> towards those with disabilities" or (ii) "When they were asked in a survey, children said that they would act <insert behavioural adverbs> towards those with disabilities"?
     
  6. Renatrix Senior Member

    polski
    That's true, but you, as an adult, can use those verbs to describe what children are saying.
    What I'm trying to say is closer to: (ii) "When they were asked in a survey, children said that they would act <insert behavioural adverbs> towards those with disabilities". The children are not using behavioral adverbs, though, but specific behaviors, e.g.:
    Interviewer: "Would you invite a classmate with disability to your birthday party?" A child: Yes, I would./No, I wouldn't./ I don't know./It depends, etc.
    Interviewer: "Would you like to have a playdate with a classmate with disability?" A child: Yes, I would./No, I wouldn't./ I don't know./It depends, etc.
    So yes, they say how they would behave or rather how they think they would behave. And I'm wondering whether there is a verb other than say that could be used in a scientific article. I know that say will work great in a neutral context, but it's an academic one here, where authors use special verbs to describe their findings. Also, it's not my phrasing - I'm translating this article.
     
  7. PaulQ

    PaulQ Senior Member

    UK
    English - England
    There is a problem:
    Children declare/state the following behaviors toward a classmate with disability:
    to this I add
    "Interviewer: "Would you invite a classmate with disability to your birthday party?" A child: Yes, I would./No, I wouldn't./ I don't know./It depends, etc"


    The bolded parts are not "behaviours" they are "responses" and children (and others) "give responses".

    I think it is time to give the full sentence (including the part after the colon) in which you wish to use this. :thumbsup:
     
  8. Renatrix Senior Member

    polski
    PaulQ, I'm not giving the sentence as the word I'm asking for is used throughout the text, both as a verb and a noun. That's why I'm describing the context rather than giving one specific sentence. How about such a sentence:
    Children declare/state the following behaviors toward a classmate with disability: playing together, learning together, and talking together.
    It seems to make no sense on its own, doesn't it?
     
  9. Renatrix Senior Member

    polski
    Here's another sentence with the "problem" word:
    The aim of the study is to reveal the attitudes and behaviors declared/stated/self-declared/self-stated by the children toward their classmates with disabilities.
     
  10. Myridon

    Myridon Senior Member

    Texas
    English - US
    Are you trying to make a distinction between what they say they do and what they actually do? If not, you're just making things complicated.
    The aim of the study is to reveal the attitudes and behaviors of children toward their classmates with disabilities.
     
  11. Renatrix Senior Member

    polski
    I'm not as I only know what they say and don't know what they actually do or will do. And your sentence seems to suggest we are talking about children's actual attitudes and behaviors. And while it works with attitudes, it doesn't with behaviors, I think.
     
  12. DonnyB

    DonnyB Sixties Mod

    Coventry, UK
    English UK Southern Standard English
    If we're talking here about answers the children gave in a survey of some sort, I think I would say "reported". :)
     
  13. PaulQ

    PaulQ Senior Member

    UK
    English - England
    You give responses, you have or display attitudes and behaviours. You can only show or display attitudes and behaviours physically: they are detected by the eyes and ears.
    That would have to be "The interviewers reported that the children displayed negative attitudes/behaviour towards disabled pupils." However, the OP seems to concentrate on what the children themselves did and their attitudes.
    In which declare/state and behaviours seem inappropriate.
     
  14. Renatrix Senior Member

    polski
    That's true, but you can also talk about behaviors you think you would show/display - then they're not shown/displayed physically - this is the case here.
    Children didn't do anything yet - they're talking about what they think they would do in interactions with classmates with disabilities. That's why it's so important to stress that these are not their actual behaviors but just something they believe they would do.
     
  15. Hildy1 Senior Member

    English - US and Canada
    Academic articles don't have to use fancy words when plain simple ones would do. I have read many academic articles over the years, and I am always grateful when the authors write clearly.
     
  16. PaulQ

    PaulQ Senior Member

    UK
    English - England
    That is pure semantics - they are "seen or heard (experienced/perceived) in the mind."

    If I ask you what behaviour I am displaying now, you have no idea, but if I tell you that my dog has just died, you would have a good idea of what behaviour I am displaying now.

    "Toward a classmate with disability, children display cooperative behavior patterns in play, learning and communication."
     
  17. Renatrix Senior Member

    polski
    Thanks a lot, PaulQ, but your sentence won't be true in my context because - as I said above - children don't display any behaviors (much less behavior patterns) toward classmates with disabilities. Children only talk about how they think they would behave. When you say "children display (...)," I understand it as a fact (children behave like this and that), which is not the case here.
     
  18. Renatrix Senior Member

    polski
    I've found an article abstract: Teenage sexual behaviour: attitudes towards and declared sexual activity.
    It looks like "declared" is used in the same way I'd like to use it. Teenagers' declared sexual activity - that is, what they say their sexual activity is, but we can't be sure it's true. So in my context, children's declared behaviors toward classmates with disabilities, that is, what they say they would behave like, but we can't be sure if they would actually act that way, should make sense - at least to scientists;).
     

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