deeming the blithe quips to be too <mawkish / sanguine>

illythebest

New Member
Korean-English
Hi I am currently studying for the GRE test and there was a sentence that I haven't got a clue what it means

The sentence is " The family abjured store-bought cards, deeming the blithe quips to be too mawkish to express proper sentiment in a tasteful manner"

What does this exactly mean? and why can't a word sanguine replace the word mawkish? I know the meanings of these words are kinda opposite but don't both of them still make sense?
 
  • papakapp

    Senior Member
    English - NW US
    Mawkish is pejorative and sanguine is adulatory.

    As an aside, your test looks insanely hard. I think over 90% of fluent English speakers would fail to get a passing grade. I congratulate anyone who could pass that without being in a native English speaking country.
     

    illythebest

    New Member
    Korean-English
    Yep GRE is notorious for its difficulty and unnecessarily challenging nature. Having lived in Britain for more than 8 years, I can't help myself from thinking what the hack am I studying this tests for, especially when my major is Chemical engineering.

    Anyway thanks for the help and encouragement. As an aide, GMAT is harder than GRE and LSAT is harder than the GMAT so...I guess I should grin and bear it.
     
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