"deep green eyes" and "dark green eyes"

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Dimmas

Senior Member
Russian
Hello!

Will you please be so kind as to help me with this little question?
Is there any difference between these two phrases: "deep green eyes" and "dark green eyes"?
Are both of them correct and sound usual, or one of them is more preferable than the other?

Dimmas
 
  • The Newt

    Senior Member
    English - US
    "Dark green eyes" is what you usually hear, but "deep green eyes" is also possible, especially if the eyes are both "deep" and "green" (rather than having "deep" modify "green").
     

    Packard

    Senior Member
    USA, English
    You do hear about "deep green" and "deep blue" eyes. But never "deep brown" eyes or "deep hazel" eyes. I suppose the green and blue are ocean metaphors, and brown and hazel are not ocean colors.

    These are the greens I associate with the ocean:

     

    Dimmas

    Senior Member
    Russian
    Thank you very much! So, it wouldn't be a good idea to say "deep green dress" meaning a strong, intense color of a garment, for example?
     

    Packard

    Senior Member
    USA, English
    It turns out that there is a much better answer than I have given and it yielded itself with a quick Google search:

    What is the difference between a deep colour and dark colour?

    Explanation:
    Color is described based on three properties:
    Hue, Saturation and Value.
    HUE is what we actually call the color (blue red yellow etc.)

    SATURATION or intensity is a description of the colors’ concentration or brightness. A pure hue has a high intensity. A diluted hue has lower intensity… (it is less “deep”)

    VALUE describes how dark or light (the colors shades or tints).

    So, Deep blue is blue undiluted with another color,
    and dark blue has some black added to it.





    The basic colors are derived from the primary colors: Red, blue, yellow

    Green is a combination of blue and yellow. As long as you are only mixing blue and yellow you have pure color.

    You add white and you get a tint.

    You add black and you get a shade.

    Deep green is a pure color.
    Dark green has black mixed in.
     

    Dimmas

    Senior Member
    Russian
    Thank you very much indeed. I should have found it myself.
    So, the deepness of color does not necessary mean the transparent substance of its holder/owner. Am I right?
    And yet you said that deep brown isn't in common use. That's interesting also. :)
     

    Packard

    Senior Member
    USA, English
    I don't know what the author meant; I only know what I understand it to mean. It might have been the intention of the author to imply some depth of character too.
     
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