defined generously

mimi2

Senior Member
vietnam vietnamese
Please tell me where the subject of "defined generously" is. Thanks.
"In the Sheffield study, although a number of boys and girls have given a great deal of thought to their future work, only just over one-third had a reasonable sound knowledge, defined generously, of the tasks which would be involved in the jobs of their choice."
Thanks.
 
  • mjscott

    Senior Member
    American English
    A number of kids thought about what they wanted to be when they grew up, but only about one-third of them had decent background knowledge in a larger extent as to what exactly people did in that field.

    defined generously is speaking about (lack of) the quantity of knowledge the students should have if they were going to embark in a career (around only one-third of the students).

    If they could have defined generously the knowledge needed to embark on a new career, then they would have gone into that field with both eyes wide open.
     

    adán

    Member
    English, USA (California)
    mimi2 said:
    "In the Sheffield study, although a number of boys and girls have had given a great deal of thought to their future work, only just over one-third had a reasonable reasonably sound knowledge, defined generously, of the tasks which would be involved in the jobs of their choice."
    Thanks.
    the verb to have needs to be in past tense to match "given" which is in the past tense. Only and Just together is superfluous (too much) and reasonably needs to be in past tense to match the rest of the paragraph.

    Defined generously (which should be in parenthesis to describe that it is a "side-statement") would be a figure of speech as a polite way of saying "the kids really didn't know anything about their future careers"
     

    mimi2

    Senior Member
    vietnam vietnamese
    Now I understand it is a past participial phrase so what does it exactly mean according to the meaning of the sentence.
    Thanks all of you.
     
    mimi2 said:
    Now I understand it is a past participial phrase so what does it exactly mean according to the meaning of the sentence.
    Thanks all of you.

    May I help you, Mimi, by correcting your sentence?


    "Now I know it is a past participial phrase and understand exactly what it means in this sentence.'

    I hope you don't mind. :)


    Best wishes,

    LRV
     

    panjandrum

    Lapsed Moderator
    English-Ireland (top end)
    mimi,
    The sentence is not very well-constructed - as others above have made clear.
    To help explain your specific point, I've put the phrase in a simpler sentence.

    I have a reasonably sound knowledge, defined generously, of grammar.

    What does that sentence mean?
    Let's begin by looking at the sentence without the past participial phrase (thanks Joelline) and without the adjective.

    I have a sound knowledge of grammar.
    Well, that is quite assertive, although we could argue about what a sound knowledge is, exactly. For fun, let's put numbers on this. These have no scientific basis whatsoever, but help to illustrate the point.
    If a perfect knowledge of grammar is 100, let's say that a sound knowledge is 80.

    Now, add the adjective.

    I have a reasonably sound knowledge of English grammar.
    That qualifies the extent of my knowledge considerably.
    If you were to ask a roomful of people to define a reasonably sound knowledge of grammar you would get a roomful of definitions, all different. Some would be very strict definitions of the criteria for "reasonably sound knowledge", some would be much less strict or, to say it another way, more generous. Using the PGS (Panj Grammar Score), the definitions might range from 20 to 60.

    I have a reasonably sound knowledge of grammar, defined generously.
    That adds yet another qualifying term. It says that I am applying the lower end of the range of PGS that the roomful of people associates with a reasonably sound knowledge - 20.

    Edit:
    I've just seen LRV's post.
    She and I took completely different meanings from mimi's sentence:D
    LRV's version:
    "Now I know it is a past participial phrase and understand exactly what it means in this sentence.'
    Panj's version:
    "Now I understand that defined generously is a past participial phrase, but I still don't understand what it means in this sentence."
    Never mind.
     

    viera

    Senior Member
    English/French/Slovak
    defined generously suggests that in their study, the researchers considered that even the children who had only slight knowledge of the tasks were counted as having reasonably sound knowledge.

    I disagree with with Adan about "only just over". There is nothing wrong with this phrase, which means "only a little more than"
     

    mimi2

    Senior Member
    vietnam vietnamese
    Thanks all of you.
    Now I understand the meaning of "defined generously" clearly. Thanks.
     
    < Previous | Next >
    Top