Deliberately make someone do something ?

< Previous | Next >

High on grammar

Senior Member
Farsi

Hello everyone:

When you make someone do something, it is considered a deliberate action. So, is it okay to say: [ she deliberately made me lose my temper.]?

And what if there was no intention involved? In that case, shouldn’t we say: [she caused me to lose my temper.]?

Thanks
 
  • High on grammar

    Senior Member
    Farsi
    She made me lose my temper would not usually be understood as a deliberate/intentional action.

    Otherwise what you say is correct.
    Hi e2efour:
    According to ENGLISH GRAMMAR A FUNCTION-BASED INTRODUCTION by Professor Givon, who is Professor of Linguistics at the University of Oregon, Eugene:
    “The more deliberate, controlling, agentive nature of the subject of ‘make is also evident in the reduced control ceded to the manipulee. Thus, the intentional, agentive adverb 'deliberately' is tolerated more in the complement of 'cause’ but less in the complement of 'make'.

    *a. She made him deliberately quit his job and leave. (wrong)
    b. She caused him to deliberately quit his job and leave.

    Thanks
     

    Thomas Tompion

    Senior Member
    English - England
    Hi e2efour:
    According to ENGLISH GRAMMAR A FUNCTION-BASED INTRODUCTION by Professor Givon, who is Professor of Linguistics at the University of Oregon, Eugene:
    “The more deliberate, controlling, agentive nature of the subject of ‘make’ is also evident in the reduced control ceded to the manipulee. Thus, the intentional, agentive adverb 'deliberately' is tolerated more in the complement of 'cause’ but less in the complement of 'make'.

    *a. She made him deliberately quit his job and leave. (wrong)
    b. She caused him to deliberately quit his job and leave.

    Thanks
    I'm not sure I agree, on several grounds; also we've moved from deliberately making someone do something to making someone deliberately do something. The controlling element has moved from the manipulator to the manipulatee. Aren't we moving off thread?
     

    e2efour

    Senior Member
    UK English
    Hi High on grammar

    What edition of Givón's book are you quoting from? I can't find it in the 1993 edition.

    You have also misplaced deliberately in sentence b, as TT points out.
     
    < Previous | Next >
    Top