Delicatessen vs Charcuterie

RR1902

Senior Member
India-Hindi
Hello.

Can anyone explain me the difference between the two delicatessen vs Charcuterie?



Thanks
P.S Here in India we call everything meat/non veg food
 
  • entangledbank

    Senior Member
    English - South-East England
    Likewise. Delicatessens are fairly common, but I doubt whether I've ever seen a shop in this country calling itself a charcuterie. If there was one, it would probably be a superior and more specialized delicatessen.
     

    Uncle Jack

    Senior Member
    British English
    "Charcuterie" was mentioned in today's Guardian newspaper (What is a ‘butter board’ and how would I even eat that?), referring to a plate of cold meat. I think this is a page from the Australian edition; it is not a use that I recognise in Britain.

    However, it raises the question, what do you mean by "delicatessen" and "charcuterie"? Are you referring to types of food, or to retailers? Both previous posts talk about retailers, but it sounds from your ps that you are talking about types of food.
     

    RR1902

    Senior Member
    India-Hindi
    "Charcuterie" was mentioned in today's Guardian newspaper (What is a ‘butter board’ and how would I even eat that?), referring to a plate of cold meat. I think this is a page from the Australian edition; it is not a use that I recognise in Britain.

    However, it raises the question, what do you mean by "delicatessen" and "charcuterie"? Are you referring to types of food, or to retailers? Both previous posts talk about retailers, but it sounds from your ps that you are talking about types of food.
    Thanks.
    I really want to know the difference. But can we use both interchangeably?
     

    lingobingo

    Senior Member
    English - England
    No. Charcuterie (cold meats) is only one of the types of food in which a delicatessen business/store specialises.
     

    RR1902

    Senior Member
    India-Hindi
    Have you read any of the answers above?

    Do you have a complete sentence in mind in which you'd like to use one of these words?
    Yes, I read all of answers above.

    E.g I went to a delicatessen to buy meat. Can I say that?

    Because we don't see such retail here.
     

    Uncle Jack

    Senior Member
    British English
    You can say that. You can buy some types of meat from a delicatessen. However, you probably wouldn't refer to the meat you buy from a delicatessen as simply "meat"; you would probably say what type of meat it was. Mostly, you buy meat from a butcher or a supermarket, which sell what might be called "ordinary" meat.

    On the other hand, you could say "I went to a delicatessen to buy cheese" because delicatessens sell all types of cheese.
     

    sdgraham

    Senior Member
    USA English
    I really want to know the difference. But can we use both interchangeably?
    This would be really bizarre in the U.S.
    A delicatessen only sells cooked meat, I think. What Americans call “cold cuts”?
    Moreover, "delis" as they are frequently called in the U.S. also sell sandwiches, soup and other ready to eat foods as well as often having a restaurant.
    For example:
    A Jewish deli, also known as a Jewish delicatessen, is a delicatessen establishment that serves various traditional dishes in Ashkenazi Jewish cuisine, and are typically known for their sandwiches such as pastrami on rye, as well as their soups such as matzo ball soup, among other dishes. Most of them are in the Ashkenazi style, due to the history of the Jewish diaspora that has sometimes been adapted to local taste preferences, as in the American Jewish cuisine. Jewish delicatessens serve a variety of Jewish dishes, and many are also kosher-certified, while some are kosher-style and do not mix meat and dairy in the same dish, while others serve food with no dietary restrictions such as the Reuben sandwich. Jewish delis feature prominently in Jewish culture, as well as in general American popular culture, particularly in the cities of New York and Los Angeles.[1][2][3]
    Jewish deli - Wikipedia.

    And ... this website will give you a clearer picture:
    History of the Delicatessen | Tony's Delicatessen & Fresh Meats
     

    Linkway

    Senior Member
    British English
    Can anyone explain me the difference between the two delicatessen vs Charcuterie?
    A delicatessen is a type of a shop.
    Charcuterie is a type of food.

    Is that helpful? Is that accurate? In which countries around the world?

    (Honest, I'm not doing porkies. :D)

    Lingobingo is right:
    Charcuterie (cold meats) is only one of the types of food in which a delicatessen business/store specialises.
     
    Last edited:

    gnommero

    Senior Member
    Italian - Italy
    It is worth saying that both words are imported from other languages, Charcuterie from French and Delicatessen from German (Delikatessen). When a shop is named with a foreign word, it is usually to suggest that extraordinary and unique items are sold there, even if a boutique sometimes sells ordinary clothes.
     

    The Newt

    Senior Member
    English - US
    In France, charcuteries specialise in pork products.

    Charcuterie can also mean the products sold in the shop of the same name; delicatessen can't.
    Not in contemporary American English, no. A century or so ago it wasn't unusual to use "delicatessen" for the food:

    Flintzer had been selling delicatessen in his store on upper Second avenue for two years before he learned that thumb-twiddling during the dull hours of the business would buy no shoes for the children. (1916)

    I am in business as a wholesale and retail dealer in delicatessen, having a retail store at No. 134 Rivington Street, Manhattan Borough, where besides selling delicatessen at retail, I also have a factory where I manufacture provisions... (1925)

    Younger Americans would never think of using the word that way.
     
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