delivered by vaginal delivery and c-section

amby

Banned
chinese
Can you help me to express the following sentences in a naural way? What do you say in English when you want to talk about how the baby was delivered?



My first niece was delivered by vaginal delivery while the second one was delivered by c-section or
I aunt gave birth to her first baby by vaginal delivery while she delivered the second one by c-section
 
  • owlman5

    Senior Member
    English-US
    Both your sentences make sense, amby. You probably meant to write "my aunt" rather than "I aunt", right?

    If you don't want to be so clinical and specific, you could replace "by vaginal delivery" with something less specific. Using "normally" should do the trick: My sister gave birth to her first baby normally and the second one was delivered by c-section.
     
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    owlman5

    Senior Member
    English-US
    @ owl

    do you not think that the two sentences are intended to be in some way related?
    I do think they are related. The first looks like an attempt to convey the same basic information while leaving the aunt out of the picture. My response is nothing more than an attempt to help amby avoid the graphic "by vaginal delivery" and replace it with something that might work better during a conversation at the dinner table.
     

    Andygc

    Senior Member
    British English
    The question was
    Can you help me to express the following sentences in a natural way?
    I would not regard "C-section" as normal British English. I would also not expect anybody in natural conversation or writing to use "My first niece was delivered by vaginal delivery".

    "My first niece was born normally and the second by Caesarean" (or "Caesarean section")
    "My aunt had her first baby normally and the second by Caesarean"
     

    gandolfo

    Senior Member
    English-British
    A natural way would be to say:

    "My first niece was born naturally while the second was* by Caesarian"

    "My aunt gave birth naturally to her first child, her second child was delivered by Caesarean"

    :)
     
    Last edited:

    NTV

    Banned
    Japanese
    My sister gave birth to her first baby normally but had a C-section for her second one.

    How does this sound?
     

    NTV

    Banned
    Japanese
    My sister gave birth to her first baby normally but had a Caesarean for her second one.

    Do this sound good to BE speakers?
     

    Beryl from Northallerton

    Senior Member
    British English
    Well look, as I have indicated, it sounds natural to me - obviously, I can't speak for everyone, I can merely venture my opinion.

    With specific regard to the 'C-section' point, i have heard all the above forms and more, and would know what was indicated in each case.
     

    Andygc

    Senior Member
    British English
    Well look, as I have indicated, it sounds natural to me - obviously, I can't speak for everyone, I can merely venture my opinion.
    Sorry - didn't mean to sound as if I was disagreeing with you :eek: - I was just curious and wanted to know if you had heard the phrase used in conversation - occasionally/sometimes/often.
     

    Beryl from Northallerton

    Senior Member
    British English
    Sorry - didn't mean to sound as if I was disagreeing with you :eek: - I was just curious and wanted to know if you had heard the phrase used in conversation - occasionally/sometimes/often.

    Without wishing to cut up all discursive and anecdotal, I've heard them all, all too many times.
     

    natkretep

    Moderato con anima (English Only)
    English (Singapore/UK), basic Chinese
    I think I myself would only say 'by Caesarian' (in my active/productive vocabulary) but I have heard 'C-section' (in my passive/receptive vocabulary) before and it doesn't sound unnatural. My impression is that medical people might say the latter? (Not sure.)
     

    Copyright

    Senior Member
    American English
    I think you hear it a lot from Americans, who seem to have an unnatural knowledge of and fluency in all things medical -- because of their familiarity with terms, I think you get some conversational abbreviations. :)
     

    Beryl from Northallerton

    Senior Member
    British English
    The colloquial medicalese expressions in BE are as follows:

    In writing "C-section".

    In speech "section". Most usually in "delivered by section" - "born by section", not so much
     
    Let's emphasise to students of English that vaginal delivery should never be used to replace natural birth.

    It's what we call TOO MUCH INFORMATION.

    Let's all ask the gynaecologists, obstetricians and midwives of our acquaintance if even they use that indelicate phrase.

    Rover
     

    gandolfo

    Senior Member
    English-British
    The colloquial medicalese expressions in BE are as follows:

    In writing "C-section".

    In speech "section". Most usually in "delivered by section" - "born by section", not so much
    Beryl
    "delivered by section" sounds more like someone being delivered to a psychiatric hospital after being sectioned under the Mental Health Act:) joking:)

    Seriously, though I've only heard Caesarian and rarely c-section used in spoken non medical Beng, however in medicalese I agree:)
     
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