demain on rase gratis

Discussion dans 'French-English Vocabulary / Vocabulaire Français-Anglais' démarrée par Tresley, 3 mai 2007.

  1. Tresley

    Tresley Senior Member

    Yorkshire / United Kingdom
    British English
    Hello,

    Does anyone know what 'demain, on rase gratis' means in this extract about Ségolène Royal?


    "Ségolène Royal n’a guère par exemple évalué les conséquences d’une rupture réelle avec le néolibéralisme, se retranchant trop souvent dans les slogans confortables qui donnent l’impression que demain, on rase gratis".

    My attempt:

    "For example, Ségolène Royal has hardly considered the consequences of a real split with the neo-liberals, all too often taking refuge behind cosy slogans that give the impression that tomorrow, [you can shave for free] anything is possible".

    Is my guess of 'anything is possible' correct?

    Thanks
     
  2. fatal lullaby

    fatal lullaby Member

    France - French
    Yeah, I think you are right. You guessed well.
     
  3. Tresley

    Tresley Senior Member

    Yorkshire / United Kingdom
    British English
    We just answered each others questions!

    Thank you Fatal Lullaby.
     
  4. DearPrudence

    DearPrudence Dépêche Mod (AL mod)

    IdF
    French (lower Normandy)
    Hello

    Isn't it "on rase gratis"? Oh, actually in your text, it is.
    So it's more something to do with promises. But I don't know what you could say :( (I must admit I'm not really familiar with this expression :eek: )
     
  5. Tresley

    Tresley Senior Member

    Yorkshire / United Kingdom
    British English
    Hello DP,

    Oh! You are right! I typed the title wrong. In the text it says 'demain, on rase gratis' NOT 'on se rase gratis'. I think I wrote that automatically because the verb I usually see is 'se raser'. Oops! [Could someone amend the title for me please?]

    So, if it is more to do with 'promises', does it have a pejorative undertone?
     
  6. Tresley

    Tresley Senior Member

    Yorkshire / United Kingdom
    British English
    I have read the link that Dear Prudence provided and I now have the impression that 'demain, on rase gratis' means that things are promised, but will never happen.

    Does 'demain, on rase gratis' mean the same as 'demain, les poules auront les dents'?

    If so, it could mean that '... the slogans give the impression that tomorrow, pigs will fly'.

    Does this sound correct?
     
  7. sacchan71 Senior Member

    Paris
    France, French
  8. Tresley

    Tresley Senior Member

    Yorkshire / United Kingdom
    British English
  9. tilt

    tilt Senior Member

    Nord-Isère, France
    French French
    Demain on rase gratis comes from a story about a barber whose window is displaying this advert. But he keeps asking money to the customers arguing each day that tomorrow is no today. It is said about promises that will obviously be impossible to hold.

    About les poules, there is usually no demain in the expression, which means never:

    - Quand me rembourseras-tu ?
    - Quand les poules auront des dents !

     
  10. Tresley

    Tresley Senior Member

    Yorkshire / United Kingdom
    British English
    Thanks Tilt,

    I think 'pigs will fly' is what we would say in English. This means 'never' too.

    Thank you.
     
  11. Staarkali

    Staarkali Senior Member

    Tilt answered already, I'd say from a business point of view, if you promise your client there is discount or some free deal tomorrow, they will first wait tomorrow, but when they come back, you say again "not today, I've said tomorrow" and so on: you won't hold that promise since tomorrow will never be reached!!

    If anyone have a english equivalent for this phrase (or the one about the chicken teeth, which is the same meaning)

    Edit: you just gave the english translation ;)
     
  12. Tresley

    Tresley Senior Member

    Yorkshire / United Kingdom
    British English
    Yes, I think that 'tomorrow, pigs will fly' is the best translation in this sentence.

    We also have the expression 'never in a month of Sundays' in English, which also means 'never', but this expression does not fit with the text I needed a translation for.

    Many thanks to all that helped me work this out.
     

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