demanding vs disagreeable

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bigsky888

Senior Member
chinese
Hello, there! There is a sentence in an exercise book as follow:
Don’t use too many d________ requests when you talk with others. It sounds rude.

My colleague asks me if 'demanding' or 'disagreeable' is OK here. I don't think they are right. But I can't explain why and don't know what word is the best here.
Please help me. Many thanks.​
 
  • owlman5

    Senior Member
    English-US
    I agree, bigsky888, that "demanding" or "disagreeable" seem to be unlikely words in that sentence. We're not really supposed to guess about answers. However, questions like this one demand that members guess. My guess is that the word is "direct".
     

    Parla

    Member Emeritus
    English - US
    That's a rather unusual exercise. Usually, judging from what others have posted, some sort of hint or choice is given as to the meaning of the word that's wanted. Are you sure this was all that was in the book?
     

    Cagey

    post mod (English Only / Latin)
    English - US
    There are already several suggestions that meet the requirement that the word begin with d.
    Without some additional information to narrow the focus, this will become a list, and lists are forbidden in this forum.

    Members should refrain from adding suggestions until we have a list of the options given in the exercise, for instance.

    Added: Cross-posted with Bigsky: As there is no more information available, I am closing this thread. The words suggested so far should be helpful.

    Cagey, moderator.
     

    bigsky888

    Senior Member
    chinese
    So I feel a bit confused too. In China, this kind of exercise is called " Word-filling", which means to put a correct word (first letter is given) to complete the sentence.
     

    Cagey

    post mod (English Only / Latin)
    English - US
    So I feel a bit confused too. In China, this kind of exercise is called " Word-filling", which means to put a correct word (first letter is given) to complete the sentence.
    I'm sorry bigsky888. I can see that it's a way to build vocabulary, but we can't answer the questions for you. At best, we can comment on your suggestions, and people have done that here, as well as added suggestions of their own.
     
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