demanding (when taking pictures)

epistolario

Senior Member
Tagalog
Someone asked a foreigner to take their group picture. He quickly made suggestions (in the imperative) on how it should be taken. Do it this way, landscape orientation, etc.

One of his companions teased him for being "demanding", a word that is used with a disapproving meaning here. It suggests that you should let the other person do whatever he wants, and avoid making demands (suggestions).

Even imperatives like "Give me your cell number or email so I can send it to you" can be viewed negatively and considered demanding by some people here.

Is the word demanding used appropriately here? If not, what do you suggest?
 
  • PaulQ

    Banned
    UK
    English - England
    As I understand it, A asks B to take a photo and then A starts to give commands to B as to how the picture will be taken. Someone with B tells B that he is being demanding.

    Demanding is not wrong - one meaning is (i) "to make many and or frequent demands of someone in the sense of asking for things or attention; to demand that someone operates to very exact instructions" but usually the adjective is used to mean (ii) "something that requires a lot of effort and/or concentration" See demanding - WordReference.com Dictionary of English

    However, given the circumstances, BE would say "You're being too fussy" (informal); "... too pernickety." (informal); "... too exacting" (somewhat formal.)
     

    epistolario

    Senior Member
    Tagalog
    Thanks, Paul. Let me use your illustration. Person A asks Person D to take their group picture (A, B, C). Person A makes imperative suggestions. Person B teases A saying he's a demanding person. B thinks that A should let D decide on how to take the picture since A is only asking for his favor.
     

    PaulQ

    Banned
    UK
    English - England
    Yes, that is how I had understood it. :thumbsup:

    Person B teases A and says "You're being too fussy" (informal); "You're being too pernickety." (informal); "You're being too exacting" (somewhat formal.)

    The strength of the comment can be lessened by changing "too" to "a bit".
     
    < Previous | Next >
    Top