demotivation

murolt

New Member
Turkish
"We should solve the problem of demotivation due to the heavy workload."

I wrote the above sentence in a word file. The word `demotivation` could not pass the spell check. I guessed that it is not an English word. I looked at some dictionaries but I could not find a one word correspondence for demotivation. May I use it in my sentences as it is ?
 
  • mytwolangs

    Senior Member
    English United States
    Well it may not be a word, "demotivation", but it implies this - "motivation is getting low". Some words are used but are not technically part of actual English, tho people will know what it means.

    We should solve the problem of the lack of motivation due to the heavy workload.
    Try that.

    I don't think there is a word that is really a one word thing for the antonym of "motivation".
     

    Vovlik

    Member
    Armenian, Armenia
    Hi,
    I've noticed that there are tons of words in English which Word spell check doesn't recognize, so it's not really a good indicator.

    The problem with the lack of motivation...sounds good, of course.

    But if you absolutely want to use the word "demotivate" you could say:

    We should address the problem of the heavy workload which is a demotivating factor.
    It slightly shifts the accent, but still...
     

    The Singularity

    Member
    English , Canada
    Demotivation is indeed not a word. You cannot simply take a word like motivation and shove "in" or "de" (any negative prefix) and expect it to be a word, silly :p
     

    cuchuflete

    Senior Member
    EEUU-inglés
    I beg to differ. Demotivate is a word in English, and demotivation is a perfectly logical noun form. Have a look at the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary:

    demotivate
    verb [T]
    to make someone less enthusiastic about a job:
    She was very demotivated by being told she had little chance of being promoted.

    demotivating
    adjective
    Constant criticism can be very demotivating.

    Demotivation is not a lack of motivation, but the reduction or removal of motivation.

    "We should solve the problem of demotivation caused by due to the heavy workload."
    That may be a little more clear.
     

    cuchuflete

    Senior Member
    EEUU-inglés
    I beg to differ your beg to differ!

    While demotivate is a word and so is demotivating, the word "Demotivation" is not!

    Amusing. :)

    It seems that a few hundred thousand users of the word do not agree with you:

    Results 1 - 10 of about 438,000 for "demotivation".
    It may take a while for the lexicographers at unabridged dictionaries to get around to including every relatively recent usage and form, but that doesn't exclude the words from the English language once they pass into frequent use.

    Some neologisms appear, are used just a few times, and then disappear. I suggest that well over four hundred thousand citations indicates that the word motivation is alive and well in English.


    Have a look at this, for example: McLoughlin, D. and S.C. Carr (1997), Equity Sensitivity and Double De-motivation, Journal of Social Psychology, 137, 668-70.
     

    Thomas1

    Senior Member
    polszczyzna warszawska
    I beg to differ your beg to differ!

    While demotivate is a word and so is demotivating, the word "Demotivation" is not!
    No offence but exclamating that is a rather shaky basis for your line of argumentation. There are plenty of words, even yet unuttered, that perfectly fit in a context and that people almost don't use.

    Tom
     

    The Singularity

    Member
    English , Canada
    I disagree. Demotivation is a random word people made up that comes from demotivate. Personally, I have never heard a man or woman say "Demotivation"

    Just simply because people use the word, as they use "Cuz" and "Brb" and "Lol", does not mean it actually is a word. Demotivation is slang, until officially described as English. Which will be in a thousand years. "No offense" :p
     

    cuchuflete

    Senior Member
    EEUU-inglés
    To our most Singular colleague:

    I work to help build dictionaries. Part of the job of any lexicographer is to decide when words have not only been invented, but have come into fairly regular use over an extended period of time. All words were inventions at one time. Those with staying power found their way into dictionaries.

    A dictionary simply attempts to record how language is used. It is always, of necessity, behind usage. It may take years for a publisher to incorporate all the new words of the prior decade.

    You are welcome to be pessimistic about the likelihood of 'demotivation' finding its way to the cyber or printed page. That opinion would be more persuasive without 438,000 google citations.
     

    cuchuflete

    Senior Member
    EEUU-inglés
    I trust even the most dedicated pessimist might give the folks at the Oxford University Press credit for some lexicographical skills. Here is a citation from one of their current dictionaries:


    de•mo•tiv•ate verb [vn] to make sb feel that it is not worth making an effort: Failure can demotivate students.
    de•mo•tiv•at•ing adj. de•mo•tiv•ated adj. de•mo•tiv•ation noun


    ©Oxford University Press, 2005.






    Just in case all of this has given anyone a singular appetite, we have a special crow dinner available:

    Definitions of "eat crow" on the Web:
    To eat boiled crow is to be proven wrong after having strongly expressed your opinion. It is most likely an Americanization of the English "To eat humble pie". The English phrase is something of of a pun — "umbles" were the intestines and other unsavories of a deer. Pies made of this were known to be served to those of lesser class who did not eat at the king's/lord's/governor's table.
    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eat_crow



     

    Thomas1

    Senior Member
    polszczyzna warszawska
    Let me chuck in a few more:
    demotivate
    [...]
    transitive verb

    Definition:

    reduce somebody's enthusiasm: to make somebody feel less interested in working or studying effectively


    de·mo·ti·va·tion [ dee mti váysh'n ] noun

    Encarta® World English Dictionary [North American Edition] © & (P)2006 Microsoft Corporation. All rights reserved.

    demotivation is a loss of the motivation to work by employees. [...]

    A Dictionary of Human Resource Management - Page 76
    by Mike Noon

    And one more here, though, this one is rather seconding Cuchu's reference.
    There's also a theory of double demotivation and plethora of examples of demotivation's usage in literature. ;)

    Tom
     

    gaer

    Senior Member
    US-English
    "We should solve the problem of demotivation due to the heavy workload."

    I wrote the above sentence in a word file. The word `demotivation` could not pass the spell check.
    I see nothing at all wrong with your usage of "demotivation". The meaning was crystal clear to me from the beginning. Even if the word did not exist—and it is quite clear that it does—the idea that you could not use it just for that reason is in itself rather ridiculous.

    Shakepeare had no right to make up countless words, using that logic. ;)

    There has been on suggestion for change that I think might be good:

    "We should solve the problem of demotivation resulting from/caused by the heavy workload."

    But your use of "due" here does not seem obviously wrong to me, and I would not misread your sentence as you wrote it. :)

    Gaer
     

    Giordano Bruno

    Senior Member
    English, England
    While I am perfectly happy with "demotivation", even though this is the first time that I've ever seen it, what about "discouragement"
     
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