depart or leave in haste

Sun14

Senior Member
Chinese
Hello my friends,

I was writing a letter to apologize for my leaving in a hurry. These two sentences are made up by myself and please could you tell me what do you think of the difference between the two.

1) I am awfully sorry that I departed without telling you in haste, even saying goodbye.

2) I am awfully sorry that I left without telling you in haste, even saying goodbye.
 
  • JustKate

    Moderate Mod
    There is no difference - none that I can discern, anyway. Departed doesn't sound entirely natural here, at least not to me - it sounds really formal, somehow - but it means the same thing as left, so it's certainly not wrong.

    On a side note, you might want to change your placement of in haste, though. Right now it sounds as though it's the telling that was in haste rather than the leaving/departing.
     

    Sun14

    Senior Member
    Chinese
    There is no difference - none that I can discern, anyway. Departed doesn't sound entirely natural here, at least not to me - it sounds really formal, somehow - but it means the same thing as left, so it's certainly not wrong.

    On a side note, you might want to change your placement of in haste, though. Right now it sounds as though it's the telling that was in haste rather than the leaving/departing.
    How about changing in haste into in a hurry? I am trying to use another term to substitute it. Beside, I try to use depart because I want to avoid the repetition of leave, since I use leave in the next sentence to explain the reason that I leave. Is there another synonyms for left.
     

    JustKate

    Moderate Mod
    But left isn't the same word as leave - they are different tenses of the same verb, but they aren't the same. So if you use left in one sentence and leave in another, there is no real repetition. It certainly wouldn't bother me if I were writing this message. But this is your sentence, not mine, so if the quasi-repetition really bothers you, you could use departed - it sounds quite formal to me, but maybe it doesn't strike everybody that way - or you could use went away.

    As for in haste, I wasn't objecting to the words, just where you put them. If you mean to apologize for having left in haste, you should put in haste adjacent to left, not telling you.
     

    Sun14

    Senior Member
    Chinese
    But left isn't the same word as leave - they are different tenses of the same verb, but they aren't the same. So if you use left in one sentence and leave in another, there is no real repetition. It certainly wouldn't bother me if I were writing this message. But this is your sentence, not mine, so if the quasi-repetition really bothers you, you could use departed - it sounds quite formal to me, but maybe it doesn't strike everybody that way - or you could use went away.

    As for in haste, I wasn't objecting to the words, just where you put them. If you mean to apologize for having left in haste, you should put in haste adjacent to left, not telling you.
    Got it. Thank you very much.
     
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