Depending on who/whom is doing the marking.

Sarp84224

Senior Member
Hindi
Depending on who/whom is doing the singing will determine on how many people will turn up.

Which is correct?
 
  • coiffe

    Senior Member
    USA
    American English
    Depending on who/whom is doing the singing will determine on how many people will turn up.

    This sentence is poorly constructed. If I had to use the sentence, I would say "Depending on who is doing the singing ..." but you can't follow that with "will determine ..." You have to say "How many people turn up will depend on who is doing the singing."
     

    coiffe

    Senior Member
    USA
    American English
    "Depending" is not the subject of the sentence. In the original construction, the subject is unclear or nonexistent. That is why I suggested an alternate construction.

    But this does not address your original question, which was whether to use "who" or "whom." In an English phrase, it is correct and natural to say "depending on who is doing the singing ..." It is not correct to say "...depending on whom is doing ..."
     

    Sarp84224

    Senior Member
    Hindi
    "Depending" is not the subject of the sentence. In the original construction, the subject is unclear or nonexistent. That is why I suggested an alternate construction.

    But this does not address your original question, which was whether to use "who" or "whom." In an English phrase, it is correct and natural to say "depending on who is doing the singing ..." It is not correct to say "...depending on whom is doing ..."
    Therefore sometimes a preposition can be followed by a subject pronoun, right?

    Here is another example:

    Things are always going to be pretty bad at the moment, regardless of who is in charge of the party.

    The use of ‘who’ is clearly right in that sentence and it’s right after a preposition, so why is that correct?
     

    JulianStuart

    Senior Member
    English (UK then US)
    Therefore sometimes a preposition can be followed by a subject pronoun, right?
    Only if the subject pronoun is in a complete clause where the whole clause is the object of the preposition.
    Things are always going to be pretty bad at the moment, regardless of who is in charge of the party.

    The use of ‘who’ is clearly right in that sentence and it’s right after a preposition, so why is that correct?
    The bold text is a complete clause - regardless of "the person in charge of the party" - and the subject within the clause is "who", the verb is "is". You can't have a subject be "whom" - whom is only ever an object. So what follows the "of" is not "whom" but "who is in charge of the party".
     
    < Previous | Next >
    Top