der seine eigene Richtung immer hat (word order)

azhong

Senior Member
Traditional Chinese
I think it’s more or less like a wind that always has its own direction to wander along.
(I am not sure if "along" is a proper preposition or even unnecessary here in the English sentence I made.)

(My translation practice)
? Ich denke, dass sie mehr oder weniger als ein Wind ist, der seine eigene Richtung immer hat, zu wandern.

(Google Translate)
Ich denke, es ist mehr oder weniger wie ein Wind, der immer seine eigene Richtung hat, um entlang zu wandern.

Q: Is the position where I place "immer" ungrammatical, grammatical but unnatural, or also natural?
Thank you.
 
  • manfy

    Senior Member
    German - Austria
    (My translation practice)
    ? Ich denke, dass sie mehr oder weniger als ein Wind ist, der seine eigene Richtung immer hat, zu wandern.
    [...]

    Q: Is the position where I place "immer" ungrammatical, grammatical but unnatural, or also natural?
    Thank you.
    It's not ungrammatical and yet semantically wrong. I think it has to do with the semantics of the verb 'haben'.

    In general this position works fine with adverbs if you use an action verb; the adverb emphasizes the verbal function, e.g.:
    Er ist ein Mensch, der immer seine Grenzen kennt. :tick: (standard word order)
    Er ist ein Mensch, der seine Grenzen immer kennt. :tick: (marked word order); Here, 'immer' attaches itself to the verb, it emphasizes the action of knowing, of being aware of it (or whatever the action verb expresses).

    With 'haben' that doesn't seem to work:
    Er ist ein Mensch, der seine eigenen Gedanken immer hat. o_O :thumbsdown: :thumbsdown:
    Er ist ein Mensch, der immer seine eigenen Gedanken hat. :tick:

    I think it’s more or less like a wind that always has its own direction to wander along.
    Who/what is it? That sounds strange!
    Better: I think she's more or less like the wind that always ... (goes its own way)
     

    azhong

    Senior Member
    Traditional Chinese
    manfy said:
    Who/what is it?
    Oh, the female "it" here refers to "die Geschichte", so it becomes a "sie". I should have noted it.

    Thank you for your thorough explanation, manfy.
     
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