Describing a fizzy/sparkling drink and a fun state of mind/fun talk using the same expression

meijin

Senior Member
Japanese
Hi, I think you use "fizzy" or "sparkling" when describing the texture of highly carbonated drink or the sound it makes. Is it possible to use these words for describing a fun state of mind or a fun talk that makes people laugh?

For example, if an ad (e.g. TV ad, poster ad) for a carbonated soft drink said "Get together with friends, grab this drink, and go fizzy/sparkling!", would people understand that this "go fizzy/sparkling" means "go wild" but the marketer used "fizzy/sparkling" because it's an ad for a fizzy/sparkling drink?

Similarly, if the ad said
"Drink this and have fizzy/sparkling talks with friends!", would people understand that "fizzy/sparkling talks" mean fun talks that make people laugh (like the sparkling carbonation?)?

What expression would you recommend?
 
  • Barque

    Senior Member
    Tamil
    For example, if an ad (e.g. TV ad, poster ad) for a carbonated soft drink said "Get together with friends, grab this drink, and go fizzy/sparkling!", would people understand that this "go fizzy/sparkling" means "go wild" but the marketer used "fizzy/sparkling" because it's an ad for a fizzy/sparkling drink?
    I'd understand it as: Have a lively and enjoyable time. Not a wild time.
    Similarly, if the ad said "Drink this and have fizzy/sparkling talks with friends!", would people understand that "fizzy/sparkling talks" mean fun talks that make people laugh (like the sparkling carbonation?)?
    I'd understand it as: Have a cheerful, animated conversation.

    "Drink this with friends and have fizzy/sparkling conversationtalks with friends!"
    I think this sounds a little more natural.
     

    meijin

    Senior Member
    Japanese
    Thanks Barque. I actually like your perceptions, which seem to go better with carbonated soft drinks. I mean, you can't really go wild without alcohol. :D
    Anyway, I'm glad that the two expressions didn't sound weird. I also agree with your last comment.
     

    Uncle Jack

    Senior Member
    British English
    The first one sounds very odd to me, but then so have many successful advertising campaigns, so don't let that put you off.

    Fizzy doesn't really have a meaning in English when applied to people, so I suppose you can use it however you want, but sparkling does. It means being witty and intelligent, not wild, and has something of a sophisticated air. This might well be something you want to promote, but it suggests something different from wild
     

    You little ripper!

    Senior Member
    Australian English
    "Get together with friends, grab this drink, and sparkle!"

    "Drink this with friends and sparkle!"

    ..... might sound a little better.

    We also refer to someone who is lively and cheerful as having a 'bubbly' personality.
     

    suzi br

    Senior Member
    English / England
    There is definitely a difference between fizzy and sparkling with reference to connotations. Sparkling people sound cool and fun. Fizzy people would make me very apprehensive / wary!
    I’m not sure exactly what solutions have been proposed so I’ll copy your originals and suggest how to make them more appealing to me! Advertising is a funny business and idiomatic phrasing is not always required, but some things definitely seem too “wrong” to risk.
     

    suzi br

    Senior Member
    English / England
    OK. Here’s my suggestions on your original:
    if an ad (e.g. TV ad, poster ad) for a carbonated soft drink said
    "Get together with friends, grab this drink, and go fizzy/sparkling!", would people understand that this "go fizzy/sparkling" means "go wild" but the marketer used "fizzy/sparkling" because it's an ad for a fizzy/sparkling drink?

    I would definitely not use WILD, obut I think that’s been cleared up already. I’d use “get sparkling” which can be a pun on the drink itself or the people. If you resist the double us of “get” (which I think is fine here) you could use “start”.


    Similarly, if the ad said
    "Drink this and have fizzy/sparkling talks with friends!", would people understand that "fizzy/sparkling talks" mean fun talks that make people laugh (like the sparkling carbonation?)?

    I would not use talks because that sounds like something politicians have, or union leaders in dispute with the management! I’m not sure what to suggest. Time or even fun could work better.
     

    meijin

    Senior Member
    Japanese
    but sparkling does. It means being witty and intelligent, not wild, and has something of a sophisticated air.
    We also refer to someone who is lively and cheerful as having a 'bubbly' personality.
    Sparkling people sound cool and fun.
    Thank you all very much! The ad wants to say that you and your friends will have a lively, fun occasion/conversation by drinking the product, so I think I'd go for "sparkling" rather than "fizzy". But "witty", "intelligent", and "cool" don't really fit. It's just a soft drink. I won't make you any intelligent or cool. I will only make you have (great) fun with friends. As for "bubbly", maybe it's unsuitable for soft drinks because it means champagne?

    I would not use talks because that sounds like something politicians have, or union leaders in dispute with the management!
    Really? I used to listen to a (popular?) American radio show called Car Talk, in which two highly intelligent jerks talk about cars with callers. Maybe it's different in BE?
     

    suzi br

    Senior Member
    English / England
    Really? I used to listen to a (popular?) American radio show called Car Talk, in which two highly intelligent jerks talk about cars with callers. Maybe it's different in BE?
    What a difference the “s” makes. Honestly you don’t have talks with a mate.

    You talk to (or with) a pal. You have talks with senior personnel.

    Here’s a link to show you “talks” in current news stories.
     
    < Previous | Next >
    Top