device rush out the door.

redgiant

Senior Member
Cantonese, Hong Kong
Background: A newly released Android tablet that was supposed to be the new IPad killer has been plagued with hardware and security woes that render the device unusable. Six out of every ten have to be returned to the manufacturer for repair or exchange. They should have ironed out the glitches and tested the product more carefully before releasing to the public. Their forum is now filled with complaints of users who are very disappointed with the tablet.

Do native speakers find "rush out the door" acceptable in this sentence:

The new Android tablet is buggy, broken, and definitely rushed out the door without enough testing?
 
  • velisarius

    Senior Member
    British English (Sussex)
    I think you'd need to say "has been rushed out the door"; otherwise it sounds as though the Android has done the rushing.
     

    redgiant

    Senior Member
    Cantonese, Hong Kong
    Thank you heypresto, velisarius. After thinking about it, I think I'd go with "has been rushed out the door" and drop "buggy", "broken". They're somehow implied by "rushed out the door" and "without enough testing".
     

    Myridon

    Senior Member
    English - US
    I think the author is considering "rushed-out-the-door" to be an adjective complement just like "buggy" and "broken."
     

    velisarius

    Senior Member
    British English (Sussex)
    Agreed Myridon, but it doesn't necessarily read like that. For me it reads like two verbs; The Android tablet "is" and "rushed". "Buggy" sounds odd to me as well, since I'm not familiar with it as a term. Personally I prefer the version without "buggy" and "broken". ;)
     

    Edinburgher

    Senior Member
    German/English bilingual
    "Is" and "rushed out the door" doesn't work. It has to be "was" (or, as has already been suggested, "has been").
    The point is that it was the manufacturers who did the rushing. They rushed it out the door means they were in a hurry to get the product to market.
     

    Myridon

    Senior Member
    English - US
    "Is" and "rushed out the door" doesn't work. It has to be "was" (or, as has already been suggested, "has been").
    "Rushed-out-the-door" is a specific kind of "rushed" (participle adjective).
    "I only had 20 seconds to comb my hair."
    "I thought your hairstyle looked rushed today."

    "This hardware seems rushed-out-the-door. It doesn't seem like they took the time to test it."
     

    Edinburgher

    Senior Member
    German/English bilingual
    "Rushed-out-the-door" is a specific kind of "rushed" (participle adjective).
    "This hardware seems rushed-out-the-door. It doesn't seem like they took the time to test it."
    OK, that works for me, but then I can't accommodate "without any testing" as part of the same sentence. This adverbial prepositional clause needs a verb to modify, and "rushed" is the only suitable candidate.
     
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