devil of a struggle fishing himself back out

karluis

Senior Member
spanish
Hola a todos
Necesito ayuda para traducir esta frase. El contexto es:
Un hombre está furioso porque había visto en la fiesta que estaba al tipo por el lo había dejado su novia. De pronto ve a otra chica (en la misma fiesta) y se queda mirando facinado sus ojos y luego viene esta frase:

He had a devil of a struggle fishing himself back out.
Él tenía un diablo luchando consigo mismo para retirarse?

No me suena muy bien, así que agradecería cualquier sugerencia.
 
  • gengo

    Senior Member
    American English
    Something like:

    Le costó bastante sacarse (del lío).

    You can put that in more colloquial Spanish.

    "To fish someone out" means to remove from the water.

    "To have a devil of xxx" means "to have a great deal of xxx" in a negative sense.
     

    pops91710

    Senior Member
    English, AE
    Of course we are talking about trying to pull himself out of deeply staring into her eyes, getting himslef lost inside them. Era un relajo para él para sacarse de sus ojos.

    El dicho devil of es igual que (pero mas suave que) decir helluva (hell of a____).
     

    gengo

    Senior Member
    American English
    Presumably it means he was drowning in her eyes (figuratively speaking).
    Ah, yes, a second read of the first post (which I find hard to follow) confirms that. So he is fishing himself out of her eyes. That is, he is struggling to stop looking at her, presumably because she is beautiful.
     

    k-in-sc

    Senior Member
    Actually, he's not just looking at her, he's looking into her eyes. Meaning she's looking back, up close.

    "... Toby moved forward to bow to her, his gaze riveted to hers. Her eyes were remarkable. Wide-set, almond-shaped, and fringed with sable lashes. So large and serious, they seemed to swallow up the rest of her face. For a moment, he let himself sink into those dark, placid pools. He had a devil of a struggle fishing himself back out. ..."

    So any translation is going to have to sound 19th-century, too.
     
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