Diary Note

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Colomb27

New Member
Italiano - Friulano
Hi everyone!

We have little B&B in Italy and our guest wrote this message in the dedication book.
Can you help me to translate this in english?

Thank's a lot.

TRADUZIONE.jpg
 
  • Enquiring Mind

    Senior Member
    English - the Queen's
    Hello Colomb27, it's a charming little note of appreciation, so you can be proud that your guest enjoyed his stay with you. It says:
    "Thank you very much. It was very good here. The atmosphere and surroundings are beautiful and it is nice and quiet. I really enjoyed the food, and they even gave me a snack to take with me. I am [name] on a walking pilgrimage from Huslenky to Venice. Farewell, and maybe I'll see you again one day."
    The writer, who is a university graduate, adds a little "smiley". It's quite likely that he's a religious person: he says he's "a pilgrim", and signs off with "s Bohem" (literally "with God'" which I've rendered as "farewell", cf "God be with you", "Godspeed", "Adieu"). The point is that someone who's not religious (or "a believer", as they say over here) would not normally use a form of sign-off that included the word "God".

    Good luck with your B&B! (Huslenky is a village in Moravia, in the south-east of the Czech Republic, and it's not, in itself, a place of pilgrimage, so the writer probably means that he's from that village.)
     
    Last edited:

    Colomb27

    New Member
    Italiano - Friulano
    Hello Colomb27, it's a charming little note of appreciation, so you can be proud that your guest enjoyed his stay with you. It says:
    "Thank you very much. It was very good here. The atmosphere and surroundings are beautiful and it is nice and quiet. I really enjoyed the food, and they even gave me a snack to take with me. I am [name] on a walking pilgrimage from Huslenky to Venice. Farewell, and maybe I'll see you again one day."
    The writer, who is a university graduate, adds a little "smiley". It's quite likely that he's a religious person: he says he's "a pilgrim", and signs off with "s Bohem" (literally "with God'" which I've rendered as "farewell", cf "God be with you", "Godspeed", "Adieu"). The point is that someone who's not religious (or "a believer", as they say over here) would not normally use a form of sign-off that included the word "God".

    Good luck with your B&B! (Huslenky is a village in Moravia, in the south-east of the Czech Republic, and it's not, in itself, a place of pilgrimage, so the writer probably means that he's from that village.)
    Thank you so much for your help!
     
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