dictation quiz vs a dictation

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Joseph A

Senior Member
Kurdish
Hello everyone,
Is either "a dictation quiz" or "a dictation" correct in the following sentences?
Teacher to their students:
A. You'll have a dictation quiz on these words.
B. You'll have a dictation on these words.
I think both are okay.
Regards,
Joseph
 
  • KHS

    Senior Member
    I use "dictation" without "quiz."
    I can have students do dictations that are not a quiz or part of a quiz.
    If I were trying to differentiate one type of quiz from another, I might say, "We're going to have a rules quiz on Monday and a dictation quiz on Thursday."
     

    Joseph A

    Senior Member
    Kurdish
    I use "dictation" without "quiz."
    I can have students do dictations that are not a quiz or part of a quiz.
    If I were trying to differentiate one type of quiz from another, I might say, "We're going to have a rules quiz on Monday and a dictation quiz on Thursday."
    Thank you, KHS.
    Do you mean as follows?
    A. You'll have a dictation on these words.
    Or I think you mean:
    B. You'll do a dictation on these words.
    I'm sorry to bother you.
     
    Last edited:

    Egmont

    Senior Member
    English - U.S.
    A dictation does not have to be a dictation quiz. A dictation can be homework, an in-class exercise, and many other things. thatSaying "we'll have a dictation" doesn't say what kind of dictation. Saying that requires one or more additional words. The term "dictation quiz" sounds quite natural to me for a dictation that is treated as a quiz in terms of how it is conducted and how it counts toward the course grade. (I don't use dictations in my classes, since teaching about information systems doesn't lend itself to them, but I understand quizzes quite well.)
     

    london calling

    Senior Member
    UK English
    Interesting. I had to look 'dictation quiz' up: in BE it's a spelling test. 'Dictation' to us is the dictation of whole texts, more often than not in a foreign language. It was part of all the foreign language exams I took through school and university.

    Tomorrow we're going to have a spelling test (BE).
     

    Joseph A

    Senior Member
    Kurdish
    A dictation does not have to be a dictation quiz. A dictation can be homework, an in-class exercise, and many other things. thatSaying "we'll have a dictation" doesn't say what kind of dictation. Saying that requires one or more additional words. The term "dictation quiz" sounds quite natural to me for a dictation that is treated as a quiz in terms of how it is conducted and how it counts toward the course grade. (I don't use dictations in my classes, since teaching about information systems doesn't lend itself to them, but I understand quizzes quite well.)
    Thank you, Egmont.
    For example, I give my students "10 words" each day to memorize the meaning of each word with its correct spelling. The next day, they do a test on them. They have to know how to spell them correctly. So, according to your reply, I think it's okay to say:
    You'll have a dictation on these words.
    If you think that my version is still wrong, please help me with it.

    Interesting. I had to look 'dictation quiz' up: in BE it's a spelling test. 'Dictation' to us is the dictation of whole texts, more often than not in a foreign language. It was part of all the foreign language exams I took through school and university.

    Tomorrow we're going to have a spelling test (BE).
    Thank you so much, london calling.
     

    KHS

    Senior Member
    I use dictations in my grammar class. I dictate full sentences at "conversational speed." That is, I include all the elisions, verb endings, and contractions that may be hard to distinguish for a language learner when participating in a conversation with a native speaker speaker. I usually do them at the end of class when I have five minutes of spare time. I may do 3 sentences, each one repeated (at "conversational speed") three times. Then I write the first sentence on the board, and read it again (conv. speed), repeated the elided portions so students can make a connection between what they heard and how everything looks in written form. I do this with each subsequent sentence.
    I do not collect the dictations.
    I think this demonstrates one form of dictation that would not be a "quiz."
     

    Joseph A

    Senior Member
    Kurdish
    I use dictations in my grammar class. I dictate full sentences at "conversational speed." That is, I include all the elisions, verb endings, and contractions that may be hard to distinguish for a language learner when participating in a conversation with a native speaker speaker. I usually do them at the end of class when I have five minutes of spare time. I may do 3 sentences, each one repeated (at "conversational speed") three times. Then I write the first sentence on the board, and read it again (conv. speed), repeated the elided portions so students can make a connection between what they heard and how everything looks in written form. I do this with each subsequent sentence.
    I do not collect the dictations.
    I think this demonstrates one form of dictation that would not be a "quiz."
    Thank you, KHS.
     

    RM1(SS)

    Senior Member
    English - US (Midwest)
    For example, I give my students "10 words" each day to memorize the meaning of each word with its correct spelling. The next day, they do a test on them. They have to know how to spell them correctly. So, according to your reply, I think it's okay to say:
    You'll have a dictation on these words.
    As london said in #5, "You'll have a spelling test on these words." Far enough into the course you should be able to say "You'll have a test" without having to specify "spelling".
     
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