did not <result in> a shorter time

NewAmerica

Senior Member
Mandarin
Logically, treatment should have resulted in or not resulted in something expected. But here, the object of the verb phrase "result in" appears to be missing.

The question of this thread is whether the object of "result in" is "a short time exacerbation."

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Metoprolol in COPD

In this randomized trial involving patients with moderate or severe COPD, treatment with the beta-blocker metoprolol did not result in a shorter time until the first COPD exacerbation than placebo.

Source: New England Journal of Medicine (the above is in the homepage of NEJM. The formal title of the article is:
Metoprolol for the Prevention of Acute Exacerbations of COPD

With background: Observational studies suggest that beta-blockers may reduce the risk of exacerbations and death in patients with moderate or severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), but these findings have not been confirmed in randomized trials.
)
October 20, 2019
https://www.nejm.org/doi/full/10.1056/NEJMoa1908142?query=featured_home
 
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  • JulianStuart

    Senior Member
    English (UK then US)
    :thumbsup: The absract explains what they were measuring and they wanted to know if treatment would affect the time.
    The primary end point was the time until the first exacerbation of COPD during the treatment period, which ranged from 336 to 350 days, depending on the adjusted dose of metoprolol.
     

    entangledbank

    Senior Member
    English - South-East England
    I have no idea what this sentence is about in detail, but I agree with tunaafi that the time until the first exacerbation is the object. Nothing is happening 'in a shorter time'.
     

    NewAmerica

    Senior Member
    Mandarin
    :thumbsup: The absract explains what they were measuring and they wanted to know if treatment would affect the time.
    I've read the passage you quoted before posting the thread.

    If it refers to the time of NO exacerbation (A time of peace until the first COPD exacerbation occurs to disturb it), then The treatment should result in "a longer time", rather than "a shorter time." So The question remains.
     

    Myridon

    Senior Member
    English - US
    treatment with the beta-blocker metoprolol did not result in a shorter time until the first COPD exacerbation than placebo.
    They did treatment with a placebo until (the time of) the first COPD exacerbation.
    Then they tried treatment with the beta-blocker metoprolol until (the time of) the first COPD exacerbation.
    The time taken by the second treatment was not shorter than that of the first treatment.
     

    JulianStuart

    Senior Member
    English (UK then US)
    I've read the passage you quoted before posting the thread.

    If it refers to the time of NO exacerbation (A time of peace until the first COPD exacerbation occurs to disturb it), then The treatment should result in "a longer time", rather than "a shorter time." So The question remains.
    "the time {from study start} until the first exacerbation of COPD." The treatment did not shorten the time. The treatment did not lengthen the time. The treatment had no effect on the time. All three statements are consistent with the data presented:

    There was no significant between-group difference in the median time until the first exacerbation, which was 202 days in the metoprolol group and 222 days in the placebo group (hazard ratio for metoprolol vs. placebo, 1.05; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.84 to 1.32; P=0.66).
    In the conclusion they state
    ... the time until the first COPD exacerbation was similar in the metoprolol group and the placebo group.
     

    NewAmerica

    Senior Member
    Mandarin
    Thank you.

    I have no idea what this sentence is about in detail, but I agree with tunaafi that the time until the first exacerbation is the object. Nothing is happening 'in a shorter time'.
    So it is the verb result rather than the verb phrase result in that functions as predicate here?
     

    JulianStuart

    Senior Member
    English (UK then US)
    One of the entries in the WRF dictionary under result is
    re•sult /rɪˈzʌlt/ v. to end in a specified way:[~ + in + object]His best efforts always seemed to result in failure.
    "a shorter time until the first COPD exacerbation than placebo.".
    In the dictionary definition, "failure" is the object of "~ + in + object". In the OP the whole phrase tunaafi quoted is the object.
     
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