Did you do me a favor by saying sorry?

My brother and my mother had a fight. So my brother says sorry, and he really doesn't mean it . So my mother says:
Are you doing me a favor,by saying sorry to me ?
Or
Did you do me a favor,by saying sorry to me ?
Is the use of "favor" correct in this sentence?
Thank you .:):):)
 
  • Barque

    Senior Member
    Tamil
    You're translating an idiomatic Hindi phrase that means an apology sounds insincere or patronising.

    If you want to stick close to the original, I'd word it as: Don't apologise as if you're doing me a favour.

    A more natural way to say it might be Don't patronise me or Apologise like you mean it.
     

    Edinburgher

    Senior Member
    German/English bilingual
    "Favour" doesn't sound very suitable here. I wouldn't class being insincere to someone as doing them a favour. Moreover, I wouldn't even class making a sincere apology as doing them a favour either.

    Doing someone a favour means doing something nice for them. An apology isn't really something nice, it is merely an acknowledgement that one has done something that wasn't nice, and an expression of regret at having done so.
     

    Barque

    Senior Member
    Tamil
    It's a literal translation. In Hindi/Urdu, the sentence using "favour" is idiomatic. The intended meaning is something like: Don't apologise to me just to shut me up/get me off your back.
     
    And if we buy something:
    Husband: I bought you a necklace last week.
    Wife: Oh really! Did you do me a favor by buying me a necklace?
    Or simply:
    Oh really! Did you do me a favor ?
    So here is the use of "favor" correct?
     

    Hermione Golightly

    Senior Member
    British English
    The example about buying a necklace doesn't sound right to me.

    -If you're going to the post office will you do me a favour and pick up my prescription from the pharmacy, please? It's just next door.

    -I don't mind lending her £50 - she did me a huge favour when she looked after the children last week when I went to A&E. In fact, I'll give her £50.
     

    suzi br

    Senior Member
    English / England
    So it's correct and natural, right ?
    Not really, it sounds very unnatural to me in the new context too. Usually you just say thanks for a gift. What purpose does this other bit serve? If the wife is unhappy for some reason, maybe she would say this mean thing? Maybe.
     

    Edinburgher

    Senior Member
    German/English bilingual
    The Hindi/Urdu version seems to use "do a favour" to mean "make an empty gesture".
    English does not use the word like that at all. It's as simple as that. It's wrong in #1 and wrong in #5.
     

    Hermione Golightly

    Senior Member
    British English
    'Do someone a favour' means to do something kind for them or to help them.
    If the wife is wondering why her husband has bought her the necklace, she wouldn't be talking about favours.
     

    Barque

    Senior Member
    Tamil
    The Hindi/Urdu version seems to use "do a favour" to mean "make an empty gesture".
    No, not exactly. The phrase the OP seems to be thinking of literally translates as Are you doing me a favour? But it's often used sarcastically, in situations where the other person's being patronising or if he offers to do something he should be doing in any case.

    I haven't figured out why a wife would say it to her husband after receiving a gift, unless he was somehow obliged to get her the gift but made it seem as if he was doing it to be nice.
     
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