Did you ever arrive to Europe?

mythceltic

Member
Slovak
I asked this question in my email. Is it Ok to use the word "ever" or it conveys negative meaning. The question was asked when there was snow in England two or three weeks ago. And I still don't know if the person arrived. Thanx Thanks in advance.
 
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  • se16teddy

    Senior Member
    English - England
    1. Did you ever get to Europe?
    The simple past refers to a specific time in the past - the time two weeks ago. The interpretation of the very idiomatic word ever in this sentence is not easy. It doesn't mean ever from then till now because the present perfect tense is not used. I think that it here means ever within the scope of that particular mission: as the Oxford English Dictionary says (meaning 1a of the adverb ever), ever is often used in relative sense: throughout one's life, etc.

    2. Have you ever got to Europe?
    The present perfect refers to the whole of past history - Have you ever in your life been to Europe?
     
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    mythceltic

    Member
    Slovak
    As you can see from the fact I rewrote my post, this is not at all a basic grammar question - I think that the word ever is here used in an odd but idiomatic way with the simple past.
    Yes, I agree, the question about "ever" in simple past is not a basic grammar question. I wanted to know If it could have negative or ironic meaning. Basic grammar question was the question about simple past and present perfect. That is what I asked you in my private thread. Thank you.
     

    mythceltic

    Member
    Slovak
    1. Did you ever get to Europe?
    The simple past refers to a specific time in the past - the time two weeks ago. The interpretation of the very idiomatic word ever in this sentence is not easy. It doesn't mean ever from then till now because the present perfect tense is not used. I think that it here means ever within the scope of that particular mission: as the Oxford English Dictionary says (meaning 1a of the adverb ever), ever is often used in relative sense: throughout one's life, etc.

    2. Have you ever got to Europe?
    The present perfect refers to the whole of past history - Have you ever in your life been to Europe?
    Thank you. So it means you would not use this sentence very often :). What do you mean "idiomatic" in this sense.
     

    Æsop

    Banned
    English--American (upstate NY)
    Ever is fine, but arrive to is wrong. We would say Did you ever get to Europe?
    That doesn't tell mythceltic that the arrive to error is in the preposition following arrive. In the case of a specific place, it's perfectly idiomatic to say, "Did you ever arrive in Europe?" if, for instance, there was some chance that the plane or ship had to turn back. There are some cases in which arrive at would be the correct phrase: "Did you ever arrive at your destination?" But never arrive to.
     

    Æsop

    Banned
    English--American (upstate NY)
    There are a variety of situations in which one could say or write "arrived at." I think at is more common than in after arrive.
    arrived at the top of the mountain
    arrived at my office
    arrived at the party
    arrived at the museum

    Maybe arrived in is only used with geographic places:
    arrived in Germany, not at Germany
    arrived in London, not at London
     

    Forero

    Senior Member
    Ever is the opposite of never in any tense. Never = "at no time"; ever = "at any time" .

    Did you ever reach Europe. No, I never did.
    Did you ever get to Europe. No, I never did.
    Did you ever arrive in Europe. No, I never did.

    Have you ever been to Europe. No, I never have.
    Have you ever been in Europe. No, I never have.

     

    mythceltic

    Member
    Slovak
    There are a variety of situations in which one could say or write "arrived at." I think at is more common than in after arrive.
    arrived at the top of the mountain
    arrived at my office
    arrived at the party
    arrived at the museum

    Maybe arrived in is only used with geographic places:
    arrived in Germany, not at Germany
    arrived in London, not at London
    Thank you for your reply :)
     

    mythceltic

    Member
    Slovak
    Ever is the opposite of never in any tense. Never = "at no time"; ever = "at any time" .

    Did you ever reach Europe. No, I never did.
    Did you ever get to Europe. No, I never did.
    Did you ever arrive in Europe. No, I never did.

    Have you ever been to Europe. No, I never have.
    Have you ever been in Europe. No, I never have.

    Thanks for your reply :) .
     
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