didn't sweat them wanting dessert

JBPARK

Senior Member
“When’s the last time you took one of those plump b*tches out to dinner and didn’t sweat them wanting dessert?”

Hello,

Above is a line from a movie called "Pain and Gain"
I am having hard time grasping the correct way of using the word "sweat" as a verb and how the word is being collocated with the words that follow.
Deducing from the context, I guess "sweat" here pretty much means "to worry about", right?
So the way this word has been used: "sweat + object + the present participle form of a verb that you hope they won't do". Is this a legitimate expression using the word?

I am familiar with expressions like "Don't sweat over something" or "Don't sweat it" but I've never come across this type of variation of the word.

Any tips or insight will be greatly appreciated.




 
  • sdgraham

    Senior Member
    USA English
    You're making it too complicated by worrying about structure but are absolutely correct that it means "don't worry about" (or "don't become stressed over")

    Yes, the example you cite is completely correct.

    Just in case you're not aware of the literal vs figurative meaning:

    Some people when stressed, start to perspire, i.e. sweat. Thus, when we say "don't sweat it," is means "don't become stressed."

    Note, however, that it's an extremely informal expression. :)
     

    bennymix

    Senior Member
    You have a good understanding, JB. You know "don't sweat over" and "don't sweat it." So you understand "Don't sweat your exams," yes?

    But as your quotation shows, longer complements are possible, mostly noun clauses or phrases. "Don't sweat that he failed to show up to your party" or "Don't sweat his(him) not showing up at your party." I think you get the idea. The complement can be as long as you please, "Don't sweat that your mom, after 20 years, finally decided, with a little pushing from her shrink, to go into rehab." "Don't sweat her shrink suggesting rehab-- you won't be paying for it!"

    Also there are possibilities like "You're going to Paris? Well don't sweat flying over the Atlantic-- it's very safe these days."

    “When’s the last time you took one of those plump b*tches out to dinner and didn’t sweat them wanting dessert?”

    Hello,

    Above is a line from a movie called "Pain and Gain"
    I am having hard time grasping the correct way of using the word "sweat" as a verb and how the word is being collocated with the words that follow.
    Deducing from the context, I guess "sweat" here pretty much means "to worry about", right?
    So the way this word has been used: "sweat + object + the present participle form of a verb that you hope they won't do". Is this a legitimate expression using the word?

    I am familiar with expressions like "Don't sweat over something" or "Don't sweat it" but I've never come across this type of variation of the word.

    Any tips or insight will be greatly appreciated.




     

    JBPARK

    Senior Member
    Thank you both. Well, I initially tried not to overthink it just like you guys described, but for some reason, as I was trying to tease out the meaning, I sort of got into this whirlwind of confusion and was never able to get out from it. I think I tried to understand it as the action of "to sweat" (whatever it may be) being done to the object that follows. But anyhow, I think I get it now.

    By the way, is adding "over" acceptable by any chance?

    "Don't sweat over them wanting dessert." (doesn't exactly roll off the tongue but...)
     
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