die of / die from

Moviefans

Senior Member
Chinese
1) Many people in this city die of heart attack each year.
2) Many people in this city die from heart attack each year.

Are both ok?
If yes, why sometimes we can only use one of the two phrases:
eg. die of hunger, not die from hunger.
die from a wound, not die of a wound.

Thank you.

Added later:

I want to add a little more here in order not to misunderstand the original sentence:

Many people die of heart attack and high blood pressure.

Is this sentence correct?
 
  • Moviefans

    Senior Member
    Chinese
    I wrote "die from" too.
    But the standard answer given in my textbook is "die of".
    I just couldn't believe there could be so many such mistakes.

    So anyone else thinks only 2) is correct ? I want to confirm that.
     

    Soliloquy

    New Member
    English (United States)
    I would normally naturally say "die of hunger" and "die from heart attacks". I have no clue why, or which is more correct though. :\
     

    Etcetera

    Senior Member
    Russian, Russia (St Petersburg)
    My dictionary says that you could use both "die of" and "die from".
    "Die of" seems to be used more frequently: about 632 mln Google results versus some 423 mln for "die from".
     

    Moviefans

    Senior Member
    Chinese
    I am still confused.
    Why my dictionary gives the example of "die from a heart attack", while in google, there are more sentences with "die of heart attacks" than "die from heart attacks".


    Besides, why sometimes people say an individual "died of heart attack", sometimes they say he or she "died of a heart attack"?

    So many uncertain things!
     

    o4a22000

    New Member
    English, United States
    I would use "die of" for any internal causes, and "die from" for any external causes, such as a gun shot
     

    Moviefans

    Senior Member
    Chinese
    I've got something.

    Thank you.

    It seems sometimes there is just no rule for one to follow. This is really a complicated world.

    It seemed easy, but now it isn't any more. English is changing. English is also more and more diversified.

    The same can be said about other aspects of this world.

    So I want to say, this world is becoming more and more crazy and complex.
     

    river

    Senior Member
    U.S. English
    I posted this on the wrong thread. You may find it useful:

    "It seems that the phrase die from is accepted in standard English, at least in the literal use of the expression [He died from cancer. But never He died from boredom], and that in some cases (when the preposition is not followed by the name of the cause of death but rather by a noun like complications/effects), it is even the preferred alternative." (Vaxjo Universitet)
     

    mcmay

    Senior Member
    Chinese
    As far as I was taught, I think that to speak of "die of sth", we have in mind a cause of death that is very direct or obvious while to say "die from sth", we have in our impression a cause of death that is not so directly observable or apparent.
     
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