difference between impeccable and perfect

< Previous | Next >

rinand1000

Member
German- Germany
Dear forum members,

in the James Bond movie "Diamonds are forever" I have heard the word impeccable the first time - it was used in the following communication.
Mr. Slumber: "I hope you'll find everything in order."
James Bond: "It has all been impeccable, Mr Slumber"

I'd like to ask if the word "impeccable" could be exchanged by the word "perfect" or if there is a difference between those two words.

Best regards
Andreas
 
  • Barque

    Banned
    Tamil
    In this context, I think Bond could also have used "perfect" to convey what he meant.

    But there are some contexts in which one might be more appropriate than the other. "Perfect" has a wider meaning than "impeccable".
     

    rinand1000

    Member
    German- Germany
    @Barque, thank you for your answer; for all members - I'm thinking about what could be an example where "perfect" could not exchanged with "impeccable".
     

    kalamazoo

    Senior Member
    US, English
    "impeccable" suggest that no fault was found. Everything was as it should have been. That's not quite the same as 'perfect.'
     

    Barque

    Banned
    Tamil
    I'm thinking about what could be an example where "perfect" could not exchanged with "impeccable".
    Sean Connery was perfect for the role of Bond - He was the ideal choice to play Bond. I wouldn't use impeccable here.
     
    Last edited:
    < Previous | Next >
    Top