Difference between "Speaking Engagement" and "Speech"

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alveifbklsiu249

Member
mandarin
Hello guys, may someone pleas tell me the difference and usage between Speaking Engagement and Speech.

I know that we can say "give a speech" but can we say "give a speaking engagement" ?

and another question here:

He visited New York for a speaking engagement.

Can we tell either He is a speaker or a listener by the sentence above?

Thank you all.
 
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  • LVRBC

    Senior Member
    English-US, standard and medical
    You cannot say give a speaking engagement. If he visited New York for a speaking engagement, he was the speaker.
    [Side comment removed. DonnyB - moderator]
     
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    Flooooooooor

    Senior Member
    English - USA
    Hi alveifbklsiu249,

    I hear "He visited New York for a speaking engagement" quite strongly as indicating that "he" is the speaker.

    If my friend told me this sentence, I would probably reply with something like:

    "Oh, what is he going to speak about there?"​

    If at that point this friend said:

    "No, no! He is going to listen to a speech -- one by a famous professor, in fact."​

    I would be quite surprised and probably ask why my friend used the term speaking engagement to describe the situation. Other native speakers, what do you think?

    As for the difference between speech and speaking engagement, I find them interchangeable in only certain situations. Speaking engagement has the added nuance that a speech has been scheduled and set ahead of time, and the speaker is possibly being paid to give the speech by some organization holding an event. Speech is more general, and can include impromptu events as well. For example, if at a birthday dinner someone is encouraged by her friends to stand up and talk for two or three minutes about the person celebrating their birthday, we can certainly call this a speech, but not a speaking engagement.
     

    dojibear

    Senior Member
    English - Northeast US
    A "speaking engagement" is an appointment to give "a speech" to an audience. "Engagement" is an old-fashioned word for any situation where you have agreed to perform. A speaker will have speaking engagements. A singer will have singing engagements.

    And both the speaker and the audience "attend the speech". But they don't both "have an engagement". Only the speaker has that. He has an "engagement to speak", or a "speaking engagement".
     

    alveifbklsiu249

    Member
    mandarin
    Thank you all so much.

    I want to use speaking engagement to make some sentences.
    Can you help me check if the usages are correct?

    (1) John have four speaking engagements coming up next month.
    (2) John refuse/accept the high paying speaking engagement in Boston.
    (3) John has been doing speaking engagements since he was 25.
    (4) John was offered/asked to make/do a speaking engagement in his alma mater.
    (5) John got his first speaking engagement yesterday.

    [Response to deleted off-topic content removed. DonnyB - moderator]


    Thank you very much.
     
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    suzi br

    Senior Member
    English / England
    (1) John have four speaking engagements coming up next month.
    (2) John refuse/accept the high paying speaking engagement in Boston.
    (3) John has been doing speaking engagements since he was 25.
    (4) John was offered/asked to make/do a speaking engagement in his alma mater.
    (5) John got his first speaking engagement yesterday.

    Thank you very much.
    Your sentences are OK for using the phrase we’re discussing, with a few changes:
    Examples 1 and 2 have grammar errors on the main verbs it should be 1.John has and 2. John has accepted

    Number 4 is incoherent with multi-choices. You need to write them out in full with the variations in use.

    [Response to deleted off-topic content removed. DonnyB - moderator]
     
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    alveifbklsiu249

    Member
    mandarin
    Your sentences are OK for using the phrase we’re discussing, with a few changes:
    Examples 1 and 2 have grammar errors on the main verbs it should be 1.John has and 2. John has accepted

    Number 4 is incoherent with multi-choices. You need to write them out in full with the variations in use.

    [Response to deleted off-topic content removed. DonnyB - moderator]
    Thank you. I appreciate your help.
     
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