difference between to hasten and to speed up or to accelerate

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rinand1000

Member
German- Germany
Hello to everyone in this forum,

up to know, I have used the words a.) to speed up or b.) to accelerate when I want to express for example, that a car increases his speed from 30 mph to 40 mph.
Now I have read in an english book the word "to hasten" which is translated to the same german word as to speed up and to accelerate.
The sentence is "domestication of work animals hastened the transition from foraging to farming".
Is there a difference between hastened and the other two words?

Thank you very much for reading my topic, best regards
Andreas
 
  • Parla

    Member Emeritus
    English - US
    Up to now, I have used "to speed up" or "to accelerate" when I want to express, for example, that a car increases its speed from 30 mph to 40 mph.
    Now I have read in an English book the word "to hasten", which is translated to the German word meaning to speed up and to accelerate.
    The sentence is "domestication of work animals hastened the transition from foraging to farming".
    Is there a difference between hastened and the other two words?
    In that particular context, not really, because "hastened" here means sped up, made faster. In some other cases, however, they're not interchangeable; often, "hasten" simply means "hurry", as in: "She awoke later than usual and hastened to get dressed so she wouldn't be late for work." And when you want to say that a car sped up, you can say that it accelerated, but you can't say that it "hastened".
     
    Last edited:

    Hildy1

    Senior Member
    English - US and Canada
    "Hasten" is rather old-fashioned and literary. It would not be used for accelerating when driving a car.

    Cross-posted.
     
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