difference between two sentences

ESC85

Senior Member
Korean
My american friends said the #1 sentence sounds weird because "the more -" part sounds positive to her, even though "getting batter on pan" is annoying.

Hence, I changed it into #2 in order that it sounds better.



I would appreciate if you leave any comment about those two.



1. The cheaper the donut pan is, the more batter you get to struggle with.

2. The more expensive the donut pan is, the less batter you get to struggle with.
 
Last edited:
  • ghotioutofh2o

    Senior Member
    USA
    American English
    My american friends said the #1 sentence sounds weird because "the more -" part sounds positive to her, even though "getting batter on pan" is annoying.

    Hence, I changed it into #2 in order that to make it sounds better.

    I would appreciate if you leave any comment about those two.

    1. The cheaper the donut pan is, the more batter you get to struggle with.

    2. The more expensive the donut pan is, the less batter you get to struggle with.
    I don't think there's a problem with the more. I think the problem might arise because get to implies that you like the activity, whereas have to implies that you don't like the activity. Generally, people don't like struggling, so I'd change #1 to "The cheaper the donut pan is, the more batter you have to struggle with."
     
    < Previous | Next >
    Top