Difference in male/female second person

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carmitsp

New Member
English - UK
Hi, I'm new to German.
I'd like to know if there's a sentence that would sound different if I say it to a male or female.
For example - You are wet, it's Du bist durchnässt for both male & female.
I know certain sentences are different if *I* am male or female.
How about if *you* are male or female?
How about for example Are you alone? Where is your shoe? Do you want to go with me? Do you want to be my friend?
Are they identical for male & female?
Thanks!
 
  • Frank78

    Senior Member
    German
    The second person does not distinguish between male and female, only between singular and plural and between formal and informal ways of addressing a person.

    So "Are you alone?" could be:

    Bist du allein? (sing, informal)
    Seid ihr allein? (plural, informal)

    Sind Sie allein? (singular/plural, formal)
     

    bearded

    Senior Member
    Hello, carmitsp, and welcome to this forum.
    German does not distinguish masculine from feminine in pronouns for the 1st and 2nd person (ich/du), but only in the 3rd person (er/sie), just like English.
    I am sure that native speakers will confirm this.
    There are languages, like Arabic, that possess different pronouns for the 2nd person (you male/female), but this is not the case in German.
    Edit: cross-posted with Frank78.
     

    carmitsp

    New Member
    English - UK
    Like - I am German, from this forum - showthread.php?t=1885371 (I can't post the full link)
    Male:
    Ich bin Deutscher.

    Female:
    Ich bin Deutsche.
     

    berndf

    Moderator
    German (Germany)
    The second person does not distinguish between male and female, only between singular and plural and between formal and informal ways of addressing a person.
    I wouldn't be so quick there. In the example you are wet - du bist durchnässt, there is no difference because predicative adjectives aren't inflected any more in modern German. But then there are sentences like you are a good physician - du bist ein guter Arzt/du bist eine gute Ärztin.
     

    Frank78

    Senior Member
    German
    Like - I am German, from this forum - showthread.php?t=1885371 (I can't post the full link)
    Male:
    Ich bin Deutscher.

    Female:
    Ich bin Deutsche.
    The personal pronoun and the verb stay the same but adjectives and nouns do change according to gender, number and case.
     

    berndf

    Moderator
    German (Germany)
    Would that also be so for cities? e.g. for Freiburg:
    Du bist Freiburger / Du bist Freiburge?
    Attached to a place name, -er is a adjectival derivational suffix and not an adjective declension ending as in Deutscher which is a nominalisation of the adjectiv deutsch. Placename derived adjectives can also be nominalized, hence non-nominalized you say du bist Freiburger in both cases and nominalized you say du bist Freiburger/du bist Freiburgerin (as SR wrote). There is an additional oddity with these -er adjectives: They are never inflected (-in is a derivational suffix and not a declension) and are spelled capitalized even when used as an adjective (e.g.: die Berliner Mauer).
     
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