differences in meaning involving slumber

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  • ps.sur.mer

    Member
    United States, English
    "Slumber" is a synonym of "sleep" but is more poetic. "Dream" can be used as a poetic word for "sleep" or "slumber" in some situations, but it more generally refers to something people do when they sleep.
     
    Hello!!!

    Can we use "slumber" to speak about the dead resting in the grave or under a tomb? For example:

    The tsar slumbers underneath this grave

    How about using "slumber" to say that one is playing the fool (doing nothing instead of being occupied with an activity)?

    He slumbered away in total inactivity
    They slumbered on the mere fame of their exploits.

    Best
     

    reka39

    Banned
    Italian
    Hello!!!

    Can we use "slumber" to speak about the dead resting in the grave or under a tomb? For example:

    The tsar slumbers underneath this grave

    How about using "slumber" to say that one is playing the fool (doing nothing instead of being occupied with an activity)?

    He slumbered away in total inactivity
    They slumbered on the mere fame of their exploits.

    Best
    I'm also interested in these questions! For example I wonder if you can use "slumber" to describe a pupil who isn't devoting much attention to the teacher at school.
    Thanks!
     
    Last edited:

    reka39

    Banned
    Italian
    How about using "slumber" to say that one is playing the fool (doing nothing instead of being occupied with an activity)?

    He slumbered away in total inactivity
    They slumbered on the mere fame of their exploits.

    Best
    If Dmitry_86 is right, does it mean that "slumber" is a synonym of "goofing off"?
    Thanks!
     

    EStjarn

    Senior Member
    Spanish
    If Dmitry_86 is right, does it mean that "slumber" is a synonym of "goofing off"?
    If Dmitry_86 would be right, it seems you could say that slumber is synonymous with goof off, i.e. "to avoid work by relaxing or performing idle activities." I don't think he is, though: a) He slumbered away in total inactivity. This would be taken literally as falling asleep, I believe. b) They slumbered on the mere fame of their exploits. Here the idea is similar to They rested on their laurels, and may be understood to have about the same meaning: to appear to be satisfied with the things they have achieved and to have stopped putting effort into what they are doing, (Collins dictionary, 2007). But I doubt it's idiomatic.
     
    Dear friends!

    Allow me to repeat my question, which has not yet been answered:

    Can we use "slumber" to speak about the dead resting in the grave or under a tomb? For example:

    The tsar slumbers underneath this grave

    Thanks!
     
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