differences in requirements between neighbouring regions are often strongest between urban and neighbouring regions

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Roundhouse

Senior Member
Bengali
I am a bit confused by the way the author wrote this sentence:

... differences in EI entrance requirements between neighbouring EI economic regions are often strongest between urban and neighbouring regions.
Can this be written in the following way without altering the meaning?

... differences in EI entrance requirements [between neighbouring EI economic regions] are often strongest between urban and neighbouring regions.
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Background: EI = Employment Insurance, Canada is divided into 60+ regions for the purposes of EI (the regions don't cross provincial boundaries). The author is trying to say that the differences in the entrance requirements [between these 60+ regions] are often strongest between urban and the neighbouring regions in a particular province. For example, the difference in the entrance requirement is strongest between Eastern Nova Scotia and Halifax (capital of the province of Nova Scotia).

Source: Here, Page 29.
 
Last edited:
  • PaulQ

    Senior Member
    UK
    English - England
    I like your version better than the original.

    I have difficulty with
    (i) the author's use of "strongest differences." Surely, it should be "greatest/most marked" differences?
    (ii) "Between urban and neighbouring regions." This is confusing as, neighbouring has been mentioned (uselessly) before and we expect the adjective following "urban" to be a contrast, where as "neighbouring" is relative to urban, and does not help the reader.

    ... differences in EI entrance requirements between neighbouring EI economic regions are often greatest/most marked between the urban regions and neighbouring ones.
     

    Roundhouse

    Senior Member
    Bengali
    I like your version better than the original.

    I have difficulty with
    (i) the author's use of "strongest differences." Surely, it should be "greatest/most marked" differences?
    (ii) "Between urban and neighbouring regions." This is confusing as, neighbouring has been mentioned (uselessly) before and we expect the adjective following "urban" to be a contrast, where as "neighbouring" is relative to urban, and does not help the reader.

    ... differences in EI entrance requirements between neighbouring EI economic regions are often greatest/most marked between the urban regions and neighbouring ones.
    Thanks a bunch, PaulQ. Every time I read the sentence, the use of "neighbouring" and "between" twice in that manner puzzled me. I kept going back to the start to make sense of why they worded it this way. I was wondering if it was just hastily written or if I was missing some important point in there.
     
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