different then dissolve

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  • ElaHuguet

    Member
    Spain, Spanish & English
    It would be helpful to have more context, but my guess is that there's a "hidden" comma there: "if different, then dissolve".

    Si nos dieras más contexto sería muy útil, pero mi suposición es que hay una coma "escondida" allí: "si es diferente, entonces disolver". :)

    Saludos, Ela.
     

    CarlosC

    New Member
    Spanish from México.
    I don't understand at all, i would be happy to help you too, but i can't understand what you mean, neither what Ela guess!

    Carlos
     

    jacinta

    Senior Member
    USA English
    It is "different than".

    My house is different than yours.
    The street you live on is different than ours. There are more trees and flowers on our street.
    La calle donde vives es distinto a la nuestra.

    He is different than others. El es distinto a otros.
    También, "He is different from others. " igual.

    Espero que esto te ayude porque no más supuse tu pregunta.
     

    E-J

    Senior Member
    England, English
    In British English, 'different from' is considered the correct construction, but these days many (perhaps even most) people tend to say 'different to'.

    You don't hear 'different than' very often over here.

    EDIT: I meant to add that 'different then' is a common mis-spelling that comes about because of the closeness in American pronunciation between the short 'e' and 'a' sounds.
     

    d2_rapi2

    New Member
    Santiago de Chile/Español
    E-J said:
    In British English, 'different from' is considered the correct construction, but these days many (perhaps even most) people tend to say 'different to'.

    You don't hear 'different than' very often over here.

    EDIT: I meant to add that 'different then' is a common mis-spelling that comes about because of the closeness in American pronunciation between the short 'e' and 'a' sounds.
    Different from, different than and different to mean exactly the same?
     

    E-J

    Senior Member
    England, English
    d2_rapi2 said:
    Different from, different than and different to mean exactly the same?
    Yes, that's right.

    Grammatically, 'different from' is the correct choice, but you will commonly hear US speakers saying 'different than', and UK speakers saying 'different to'. I would advise a non-native speaker to use 'different from' but to be aware of the other two variations.
     
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